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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) or search for Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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fall upon the railroads. General Warren, with fifteen thousand men, was working his way through the tangled woods and low swamps in the direction of Lee's right. At the same time, Lee stripped his entrenchments at Petersburg as much as he dared and hurried General Anderson, with infantry, and Fitzhugh Lee, with cavalry, forward to hold the roads over which he hoped to escape. On Friday morning, March 31st, the opposing forces, the Confederates much reenforced, found themselves at Dinwiddie Court House. The woods and swamps prevented the formation of a regular line of battle. Lee made his accustomed flank movement, with heavy loss to the Federals as they tried to move in the swampy forests. The Northerners finally were ready to advance when it was found that Lee had fallen back. During the day and night, reenforcements were coming in from all sides. The Confederates had taken their position at Five Forks. Early the next afternoon, the 1st of April, Sheridan, reenforced by W
fall upon the railroads. General Warren, with fifteen thousand men, was working his way through the tangled woods and low swamps in the direction of Lee's right. At the same time, Lee stripped his entrenchments at Petersburg as much as he dared and hurried General Anderson, with infantry, and Fitzhugh Lee, with cavalry, forward to hold the roads over which he hoped to escape. On Friday morning, March 31st, the opposing forces, the Confederates much reenforced, found themselves at Dinwiddie Court House. The woods and swamps prevented the formation of a regular line of battle. Lee made his accustomed flank movement, with heavy loss to the Federals as they tried to move in the swampy forests. The Northerners finally were ready to advance when it was found that Lee had fallen back. During the day and night, reenforcements were coming in from all sides. The Confederates had taken their position at Five Forks. Early the next afternoon, the 1st of April, Sheridan, reenforced by W
865: Quaker Road, Va. Union, Warren's Fifth Corps and Griffin's First Division, Army of the Potomac; Confed., Part of Gen. R. E. Lee's Army. Losses: Union, 55 killed, 306 wounded; Confed., 135 killed, 400 wounded, 100 missing. March 31, 1865: Boydton and White Oak roads, Va. Union, Second and Fifth Corps; Confed., part of Gen. R. E. Lee's command. Losses: Union, 177 killed, 1134 wounded, 556 missing; Confed., 1000 killed, 235 missing. March 31, 1865: Dinwiddie C. H., Va. Union, First, Second, and Third Divisions Cavalry of the Army of the Potomac; Confed., Cav. under Gen. Fitzhugh Lee and Gen. W. H. F. Lee. Losses: Union, 67 killed, 354 wounded; Confed., 400 killed and wounded. April, 1865. April 1, 1865: five Forks, Va. Union, First, Second, and Third Cav. Divisions and Fifth Corps; Confed., Gen. Geo. E. Pickett's command, Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's Cav., including Rosser's and Munford's Divisions. Losses: Union, 124 kill