Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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army, active service holds a double hazard. Visitors to Federal camps often wondered at soldiers in Confederate gray chatting or playing cards with the men in blue and being allowed to pass freely. These were Federal spies, always in danger of being captured and summarily shot, not only by the Confederates, but in returning and attempting to regain their own lines. previous spring. One year before, the magnificent Army of the Potomac, just from a long winter's rest in the encampment at Falmouth on the north bank of the Rappahannock, had met the legions of the South in deadly combat on the battlefield of Chancellorsville. And now Grant was leading the same army, whose ranks had been freshened by new recruits from the North, through the same field of war. By eight o'clock on the morning of the 4th the various rumors as to the Federal army's crossing the Rapidan received by Lee were fully confirmed, and at once he prepared to set his own army in motion for the Wilderness, and to
me to an immense Federal fighters at Reams' Station. these men of Barlow's First division of the Second Corps, under command of Brigadier-General Nelson A. Miles, gallantly repulsed the Second and third attacks by the Confederates upon Reams' Station, where Hancock's men were engaged in destroying the Weldon Railroad on August 24, 1864. in the First picture is seen Company D of the famous Clinton guard, as the sixty-first New York infantry called itself. The picture was taken at Falmouth in April, 1863, and the trim appearance of the troops on dress parade indicates nothing of the heavy losses they sustained when at Fredericksburg, led by Colonel miles, they fought with distinguished bravery against Jackson's men. Not only the regiment but its officers attained renown, for the regiment had the honor to be commanded by able soldiers. First, Francis C. Barlow was its Colonel, then Nelson A. Miles, then Oscar A. Broady, and lastly George W. Scott. Federal fighters at Rea
me to an immense Federal fighters at Reams' Station. these men of Barlow's First division of the Second Corps, under command of Brigadier-General Nelson A. Miles, gallantly repulsed the Second and third attacks by the Confederates upon Reams' Station, where Hancock's men were engaged in destroying the Weldon Railroad on August 24, 1864. in the First picture is seen Company D of the famous Clinton guard, as the sixty-first New York infantry called itself. The picture was taken at Falmouth in April, 1863, and the trim appearance of the troops on dress parade indicates nothing of the heavy losses they sustained when at Fredericksburg, led by Colonel miles, they fought with distinguished bravery against Jackson's men. Not only the regiment but its officers attained renown, for the regiment had the honor to be commanded by able soldiers. First, Francis C. Barlow was its Colonel, then Nelson A. Miles, then Oscar A. Broady, and lastly George W. Scott. Federal fighters at Rea