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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Contents   page Map--Theatre of Georgia and the Carolinas CAMPAIGNS2 Frontispiece--A shot that Startled WASHINGTON4 introduction   Frederick Dent Grant13 Part I Grant Versus Lee   Henry W. Elson   the battle in the WILDERNESS21  Spotsylvania and the Bloody Angle51  attack and repulse at Cold Harbor79 Part II the simultaneous movements   Henry W. Elson   Drewry's Bluff IMPREGNABLE93  to Atlanta — Sherman Versus JOHNSTON99  the last conflicts in the SHENANDOAH139 Part III closing in   Henry W. Elson   Charleston, the unconquered PORT169  the investment of Petersburg175  Sherman's final CAMPAIGNS209 Part IV from war to peace   Henry W. Elson   Nashville — the end in Tennessee   the siege and fall of Petersburg   Appomattox  Part V engagements of the Civil War from May, 1864, to May, 1865   George L. Kilmer  Photographic descriptions thr
Lee facing the Army of the Potomac and guarding Richmond, while that of Johnston was at Dalton, in the northern part of Georgia, facing Sherman and defending Atlanta, a great railroad center and a point of concentration of supplies for the Confederlley. Columns of men were engaged in battle on the James River, in the Wilderness, in the Shenandoah valley, and in northern Georgia. In a few days the question was to be determined whether the North or the South possessed the military mastery of tEarly to pass through in making raids on the North; while the right wing of the Union army pushed its way on through northern Georgia to the Chattahoochee River, which it crossed, and moved toward Atlanta. The first phase of the great campaign was tod's army, and to abandon the lines of supplies to the rear; and then for Sherman to push on to the sea, cutting through Georgia, living off the country, and destroying as far as possible the store houses from which the army in Richmond gathered its
arren's troops did not falter or pause until some had reached the abatis and others the very crest of the parapet. A few, indeed, were actually killed inside the works. All, however, who survived the terrible ordeal were finally driven back with heavy loss. General James C. Rice was mortally wounded. To the left of Warren, General Wright had observed what he believed to be a vulnerable spot in the Confederate entrenchments. Behind this particular place was stationed Doles' brigade of Georgia regiments, and Colonel Emory Upton was ordered to charge Doles with a column of twelve regiments in four lines. The ceasing of the Federal artillery at six o'clock was the signal for the charge, and twenty minutes later, as Upton tells us, at command, the lines rose, moved noiselessly to the edge of the wood, and then, with a wild cheer and faces averted, rushed for the works. Through a terrible front and flank fire the column advanced quickly, gaining the parapet. Here occurred a deadly
arren's troops did not falter or pause until some had reached the abatis and others the very crest of the parapet. A few, indeed, were actually killed inside the works. All, however, who survived the terrible ordeal were finally driven back with heavy loss. General James C. Rice was mortally wounded. To the left of Warren, General Wright had observed what he believed to be a vulnerable spot in the Confederate entrenchments. Behind this particular place was stationed Doles' brigade of Georgia regiments, and Colonel Emory Upton was ordered to charge Doles with a column of twelve regiments in four lines. The ceasing of the Federal artillery at six o'clock was the signal for the charge, and twenty minutes later, as Upton tells us, at command, the lines rose, moved noiselessly to the edge of the wood, and then, with a wild cheer and faces averted, rushed for the works. Through a terrible front and flank fire the column advanced quickly, gaining the parapet. Here occurred a deadly
great army of one hundred thousand veterans. Buzzard's roost, Georgia, May 7, 1864 The second Minnesota infantry--engaged at rocky facseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles southeast of Chattanooga. It was by chanc of General Thomas at Ringgold, Georgia, May 5, 1864. Tunnel hill, Ga., beyond which Johnston occupied a strong position buzzard's roost gan not to fight was a The battlefield of New hope Church, in Georgia. These views of the battlefield of New Hope Church, in Georgia,Georgia, show the evidences of the sharp struggle at this point that was brought on by Sherman's next attempt to flank Johnston out of his position af the two great armies among the hills and forests of that part of Georgia that it is impossible for us to follow them all. On the 14th of Juften hampered capable leaders on both sides. His Fabian policy in Georgia was precisely the same as that which was winning fame against heav
great army of one hundred thousand veterans. Buzzard's roost, Georgia, May 7, 1864 The second Minnesota infantry--engaged at rocky facseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles southeast of Chattanooga. It was by chanc of General Thomas at Ringgold, Georgia, May 5, 1864. Tunnel hill, Ga., beyond which Johnston occupied a strong position buzzard's roost gan not to fight was a The battlefield of New hope Church, in Georgia. These views of the battlefield of New Hope Church, in Georgia,Georgia, show the evidences of the sharp struggle at this point that was brought on by Sherman's next attempt to flank Johnston out of his position af the two great armies among the hills and forests of that part of Georgia that it is impossible for us to follow them all. On the 14th of Juften hampered capable leaders on both sides. His Fabian policy in Georgia was precisely the same as that which was winning fame against heav
ne side and the Federal blockading fleet on the other. Yet there he remained at his post, catching with his lens the ruins of the uncaptured Fort and the untaken city in 1864. How well he made these pictures may be seen on the pages preceding and the lower picture opposite. They furnish a glimpse into American history that most people — least of all the Confederate veterans themselves — never expected to enjoy. Those who actually knew what it was to be besieged in Petersburg, invaded in Georgia, starved in Tennessee, or locked up by a blockading fleet — such veterans have been astonished to find these authenticated photographs of the garrison beleaguered in the most important of Southern ports. Remains of the circular church and secession hall, where South Carolina decided to leave the Union On the battery, Charleston's spacious promenade Inside Fort Moultrie--looking eastward Outside Fort Johnson--Sumter in the distance The desolate interior of Sumter in Septembe<
than a grand picnic, declared one of his division commanders, in speaking of the march through Georgia and the Carolinas. Almost immediately after the capture of Atlanta, Sherman, deciding to remhe road . . . send back all my wounded and worthless, and, with my effective army, move through Georgia, smashing things to the sea. Grant thought it best for Sherman to destroy Hood's army Cuttiou, as a Christmas gift, the City of Savannah. and Milledgeville, the latter the capital of Georgia, about a hundred miles to the southeast. These two towns were about fifteen miles apart. Gee Ogeechee River was crossed, the character of the country was greatly changed from that of central Georgia. No longer were there fertile farms, laden with their Southern The spoils of victory: talt, skirmishing most of the way. the country and despoiling the people than they had felt in Georgia. The reason for this, given by Sherman and others, was that there was a feeling of bitterness
Those who actually knew what it was to be besieged in Petersburg, invaded in Georgia, starved in Tennessee, or locked up by a blockading fleet — such veterans havenic, declared one of his division commanders, in speaking of the march through Georgia and the Carolinas. Almost immediately after the capture of Atlanta, Shermand back all my wounded and worthless, and, with my effective army, move through Georgia, smashing things to the sea. Grant thought it best for Sherman to destroy Hoos gift, the City of Savannah. and Milledgeville, the latter the capital of Georgia, about a hundred miles to the southeast. These two towns were about fifteen mwas crossed, the character of the country was greatly changed from that of central Georgia. No longer were there fertile farms, laden with their Southern The spomost of the way. the country and despoiling the people than they had felt in Georgia. The reason for this, given by Sherman and others, was that there was a feeli
ding dismay and destruction in their midst. The intrepid Sheridan urged his black battle-charger, the famous Rienzi, now known as Winchester, up and down the lines, cheering his men on in the fight. He seemed to be everywhere at once. The Confederate left was streaming down the White Oak Road. But General Crawford had reached a cross-road, by taking a circuitous route, and the Southern army was thus shut off from retreat. The Federal Siege of Petersburg. To this gallant young Georgia officer, just turned thirty-three at the time, Lee entrusted the last desperate effort to break through the tightening Federal lines, March 25, 1865. Lee was confronted by the dilemma of either being starved out of Petersburg and Richmond, or of getting out himself and uniting his army to that of Johnston in North Carolina, to crush Sherman before Grant could reach him. Gordon was to begin this latter, almost impossible, task by an attack on Fort Stedman, which the Confederates believed to
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