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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Contents   page Map--Theatre of Georgia and the Carolinas CAMPAIGNS2 Frontispiece--A shot that Startled WASHINGTON4 introduction   Frederick Dent Grant13 Part I Grant Versus Lee   Henry W. Elson   the battle in the WILDERNESS21  Spotsylvania and the Bloody Angle51  attack and repulse at Cold Harbor79 Part II the simultaneous movements   Henry W. Elson   Drewry's Bluff IMPREGNABLE93  to Atlanta — Sherman Versus JOHNSTON99  the last conflicts in the SHENANDOAH139 Part III closing in   Henry W. Elson   Charleston, the unconquered PORT169  the investment of Petersburg175  Sherman's final CAMPAIGNS209 Part IV from war to peace   Henry W. Elson   Nashville — the end in Tennessee   the siege and fall of Petersburg   Appomattox  Part V engagements of the Civil War from May, 1864, to May, 1865   George L. Kilmer  Photographic descriptions thr
sapeake Bay to the Potomac River, up that river to near Washington, the northern border of Virginia as far as Harper's Ferry, covered by the Army of the Potomac; across the mountains into West Virginia, to the headwaters of the Holston River in Tennessee, down that river and the Tennessee to Chattanooga, and thence along the Memphis and Charleston Railroad to the Mississippi, which was also in Union hands. All south of that line was in the hands of the Confederates, except a few stations alongan's troopers were pressed forward up the Shenandoah Valley, to cross over to the headwaters of the James River, and down that stream to join the armies of the Potomac and of the James in front of Richmond and Petersburg. Stoneman moved from east Tennessee into the Virginias. The circle was contracted and the Confederacy was pressed on every side. This constituted the second phase of the great campaign, and the grand finale was about to be enacted. As soon as Sheridan reached the Army of t
h on May 28th Johnson himself was wounded, but recovered in time to join Schofield after the fall of Atlanta and to assist him in driving Hood and Forrest out of Tennessee. For his bravery at the battle of Nashville he was brevetted brigadier-general, U. S. A., December 16, 1864, and after the war he was retired with the brevet of there were instances of father and son, one in blue and the other in gray, and brothers on opposite sides, meeting one another on the bloody slopes of Kenesaw. Tennessee and Kentucky had sent thousands of men to each side in the fratricidal struggle and not infrequently families had been divided. Three weeks of almost incessanhe fact that Johnston had so steadily retreated before the Northern army as an excuse for his removal. On the 18th of July, Davis turned the Confederate Army of Tennessee over to General John B. Hood. A graduate of West Point of the class of 1853, a classmate of McPherson, Schofield, and Sheridan, Hood had faithfully served the c
h on May 28th Johnson himself was wounded, but recovered in time to join Schofield after the fall of Atlanta and to assist him in driving Hood and Forrest out of Tennessee. For his bravery at the battle of Nashville he was brevetted brigadier-general, U. S. A., December 16, 1864, and after the war he was retired with the brevet of there were instances of father and son, one in blue and the other in gray, and brothers on opposite sides, meeting one another on the bloody slopes of Kenesaw. Tennessee and Kentucky had sent thousands of men to each side in the fratricidal struggle and not infrequently families had been divided. Three weeks of almost incessanhe fact that Johnston had so steadily retreated before the Northern army as an excuse for his removal. On the 18th of July, Davis turned the Confederate Army of Tennessee over to General John B. Hood. A graduate of West Point of the class of 1853, a classmate of McPherson, Schofield, and Sheridan, Hood had faithfully served the c
al blockading fleet on the other. Yet there he remained at his post, catching with his lens the ruins of the uncaptured Fort and the untaken city in 1864. How well he made these pictures may be seen on the pages preceding and the lower picture opposite. They furnish a glimpse into American history that most people — least of all the Confederate veterans themselves — never expected to enjoy. Those who actually knew what it was to be besieged in Petersburg, invaded in Georgia, starved in Tennessee, or locked up by a blockading fleet — such veterans have been astonished to find these authenticated photographs of the garrison beleaguered in the most important of Southern ports. Remains of the circular church and secession hall, where South Carolina decided to leave the Union On the battery, Charleston's spacious promenade Inside Fort Moultrie--looking eastward Outside Fort Johnson--Sumter in the distance The desolate interior of Sumter in September, 1863, after the gu<
te leaders. These involved nothing less than a fresh invasion of Tennessee, which, in the opinion of President Davis, would put Sherman in an to Atlanta, leaving General Thomas to meet Hood's appearance in Tennessee. It was about this time that Sherman fully decided to march to tllow him. Grant was finally won to the view that if Hood moved on Tennessee, Thomas would be able to check him. He had, on the 11th of Octoberal Beauregard, who had come from the East to assist him, were in Tennessee, and it was some days after Sherman had left Atlanta that they herates thereupon turned their attention to Thomas, who was also in Tennessee, and was the barrier between Hood and the Northern States. Genand he refrained from assault. General Hardee, sent by Hood from Tennessee, had command of the defenses, with about fifteen thousand men. AnWest with over twenty-two thousand men from the army of Thomas in Tennessee. But there was little need of reenforcement. Sherman's third gr
Nashville — the end in Tennessee Guarding the Cumberland — where Thomas watched for Hood at the Nashville bridgeSherman well on his march to the sea, the struggle in middle Tennessee had reached a crisis. Hood had invaded the State andHood. General Thomas was sent by Sherman to take care of Tennessee, and he was preparing to weld many fragmentary bodies of cious movement upon Sherman's communications, by invading Tennessee--without however tempting the Northern commander from hissupply center for all the Federal posts maintained in eastern Tennessee. Therefore it had been well fortified, so strongly ince on November 14th. General Hood was now free to invade Tennessee. Sherman had sent the Fourth Corps, under Stanley, and t. After Sherman had taken Atlanta he sent Thomas back to Tennessee to grapple with Hood. How he crushed Hood by his sledge-in pike through Brentwood Pass. This Confederate Army of Tennessee had had a glorious history. It had fought with honor fro
volved nothing less than a fresh invasion of Tennessee, which, in the opinion of President Davis, w General Thomas to meet Hood's appearance in Tennessee. It was about this time that Sherman fully inally won to the view that if Hood moved on Tennessee, Thomas would be able to check him. He had, d their attention to Thomas, who was also in Tennessee, and was the barrier between Hood and the No assault. General Hardee, sent by Hood from Tennessee, had command of the defenses, with about fif-two thousand men from the army of Thomas in Tennessee. But there was little need of reenforcementder of his army. Nashville — the end in Tennessee Guarding the Cumberland — where Thl Thomas was sent by Sherman to take care of Tennessee, and he was preparing to weld many fragmentat upon Sherman's communications, by invading Tennessee--without however tempting the Northern commaer 14th. General Hood was now free to invade Tennessee. Sherman had sent the Fourth Corps, under S[6 more...]<
ry cooperation of a land force, and of four monitors to deal with the powerful Confederate ram Tennessee. The naval operations were entirely successful, but Fort Morgan had received hardly a scratch,unded, and missing. September, 1864. September 1-8, 1864: Rousseau's pursuit of Wheeler in Tenn. Union, Rousseau's Cav., 1st and 4th Tenn., 2d Mich., 1st Wis., 8th Iowa, 2d and 8th Ind., andd, 100 missing; Confed., 150 killed, wounded, and missing. November 13, 1864: Bull's Gap., Tenn. Union, 8th, 9th, and 13th Tenn. Cav.; Confed., advance of Gen. Hood's army. Losses: ion, 40 killed, 329 wounded; Confed. No record found. December 4, 1864: block-house no. 7, Tenn. Union, Gen. Milroy's troops; Confed., Gen. Bate's division of Hood's army. Losses: Urland, Maryland, and other stations, 9337; in the Department of Washington, 3390; in Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, 13,922; at Nashville and Chattanooga, Tenn., 5029. Miscellane