Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Savannah (Georgia, United States) or search for Savannah (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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ff the country, and destroying as far as possible the store houses from which the army in Richmond gathered its food. Hood followed one of the detachments from Sherman's army, and penetrated as far north as Nashville, where, in December, the decisive battle of Nashville was fought. This relieved the country in the rear of the line from menace, and one might say that the Confederacy was limited to the segment of a circle the circumference of which would pass through Richmond, Petersburg, Savannah, Atlanta, and Nashville. The policy maintained was continually to reduce the size of this circle until the Confederacy was crushed. Sherman turned north, marching through the Carolinas. Part of the troops that had fought at Nashville under Thomas were sent to Wilmington, under Schofield, after the fall of Fort Fisher. Sheridan's troopers were pressed forward up the Shenandoah Valley, to cross over to the headwaters of the James River, and down that stream to join the armies of the Pot
I only regarded the march from Atlanta to Savannah as a shift of base, as the transfer of a stroarolina. Hardee's task therefore was to hold Savannah just as long as possible, and then to withdra From only one direction, the westward, could Savannah be approached without difficult feats of engirfront. While Sherman's army was approaching Savannah one of his officers had his leg blown off by ttle Confederate garrison had held the key to Savannah. The city was the first to fall of the Confe. Destruction that followed war Ruins at Savannah, 1865 with which these war-stained veterans me? Sherman had set his heart on capturing Savannah; but, on December 15th, he received a letter ore, Savannah. Wagon-trains leaving Savannah. Here the wagon-trains of the victorious arm little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared still commanded the cavalry. The march from Savannah averaged ten miles a day, which, in view of t[26 more...]
I only regarded the march from Atlanta to Savannah as a shift of base, as the transfer of a stroter starting, at Gordon The defense of Savannah. The task of General Hardee in defending Se best time for withdrawing from the lines at Savannah. The defender of Savannah: General Harde From only one direction, the westward, could Savannah be approached without difficult feats of engil. On one occasion Sherman Defense of Savannah. Savannah was better protected by nature frfront. While Sherman's army was approaching Savannah one of his officers had his leg blown off by but the great majority preferred to remain in Savannah. During the night before the Federal occupatme? Sherman had set his heart on capturing Savannah; but, on December 15th, he received a letter the victorious army are ready just outside of Savannah for the march northward. The troops, in highfrom Atlanta to the sea at one, and that from Savannah through the Carolinas at ten. Leaving his [26 more...]
tions for the opening of a determined campaign with the coming of spring. Mile after mile had been added to his entrenchments, and they now extended to Hatcher's Run on the left. The Confederate lines had been stretched until they were so thin that there was constant danger of breaking. A. P. Hill was posted on the right; Gordon and Anderson held the center, and Longstreet was on the left. Union troops were mobilizing in front of Petersburg. By February 1st, Sherman was fairly off from Savannah on his northward march to join Grant. He was weak in cavalry and Siege of Petersburg. For nine months of 1864-1865 the musket-balls sang past these Federal picket posts, in advance of Federal Fort Sedgwick, called by the Confederates Fort Hell. Directly opposite was the Confederate Fort Mahone, which the Federals, returning the compliment, had dubbed Fort Damnation. Between the two lines, separated by only fifty yards, sallies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences afte
tions for the opening of a determined campaign with the coming of spring. Mile after mile had been added to his entrenchments, and they now extended to Hatcher's Run on the left. The Confederate lines had been stretched until they were so thin that there was constant danger of breaking. A. P. Hill was posted on the right; Gordon and Anderson held the center, and Longstreet was on the left. Union troops were mobilizing in front of Petersburg. By February 1st, Sherman was fairly off from Savannah on his northward march to join Grant. He was weak in cavalry and Siege of Petersburg. For nine months of 1864-1865 the musket-balls sang past these Federal picket posts, in advance of Federal Fort Sedgwick, called by the Confederates Fort Hell. Directly opposite was the Confederate Fort Mahone, which the Federals, returning the compliment, had dubbed Fort Damnation. Between the two lines, separated by only fifty yards, sallies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences afte
ter's Cav.; Confed., Cavalry of Gen. Early's army. Losses: Union, 43 killed and wounded. Confed. No record found. December 10-21, 1864: siege of Savannah, Ga. Union, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Seventeenth, and Twentieth Corps of Sherman's army; Confed., Gen. W. J. Hardee's command. Losses: Union, 200 killed 22d east of Atlanta, receiving and finally repulsing attacks in both front and rear. They had marched with Sherman to the sea and participated in the capture of Savannah. They had joined in the campaign through the Carolinas, part of the time leading the advance and tearing up many miles of railway track, and operating on the exle the rest of Sherman's army was engaged in attacking Hood's retreating columns. In the march to the sea the corps was commanded by General A. S. Williams. At Savannah the troops again had the honor of being the first to enter an evacuated city, the second division marching in on the morning of December 21, 1864. In the march