Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 36 results in 6 document sections:

olicy to keep the Confederate armies within the besieged cities, Richmond, Petersburg, and Atlanta, and actively to engage the outside troops, to drive all the smaller bands to the south, to devastate the country from which supplies were drawn, and, as far as possible, to destroy the troops that gathered these supplies. In these movements the most active and most effective column was the Army of the Shenandoah, which soon sent the opposing force, as Sheridan expressed it, whirling through Winchester, annihilated two armies gathered to protect the Valley, and destroyed all the war supplies it contained. In the meantime, the Confederate Government, finding that it was losing so much ground by its defensive policy, relieved Johnston, an officer of great ability, who was commanding at Atlanta. Hood was placed in charge of that wing of the army. He immediately assumed the offensive and attacked the Army of the Tennessee on the 22d of July, but was defeated and thrown back, with great
, repulsed them, and continued on his way to Winchester, where General Averell, from Hunter's forcesook was sent up the Valley after him, but at Kernstown, near Winchester, on July 24th, he met a disWinchester, on July 24th, he met a disastrous defeat and made his way to the north side of the Potomac. Early, now in undisputed possessi found the Confederate forces centered about Winchester, and the Union army was ten miles distant, ws irretrievably lost. They fell back toward Winchester in confusion. As they did so, a great uproae of Sheridan, to send them whirling through Winchester. The Union pursuit continued until the twil returned at once by special train, reaching Winchester on the evening of the 18th. Just after da rally his soldiers on that famous ride from Winchester, twenty miles away. As he reined up his panong the broad valley highway that leads from Winchester, General Sheridan had galloped to where his flying mob. While riding leisurely away from Winchester about nine o'clock he had heard unmistakable[3 more...]
, repulsed them, and continued on his way to Winchester, where General Averell, from Hunter's forcesook was sent up the Valley after him, but at Kernstown, near Winchester, on July 24th, he met a disWinchester, on July 24th, he met a disastrous defeat and made his way to the north side of the Potomac. Early, now in undisputed possessi found the Confederate forces centered about Winchester, and the Union army was ten miles distant, wd Martinsburg pike as a base. The town of Winchester is situated on this road, and was therefore onfederate outwork, guarding the approach to Winchester. Both generals had the same plan of battle s irretrievably lost. They fell back toward Winchester in confusion. As they did so, a great uproa returned at once by special train, reaching Winchester on the evening of the 18th. Just after da rally his soldiers on that famous ride from Winchester, twenty miles away. As he reined up his panong the broad valley highway that leads from Winchester, General Sheridan had galloped to where his [3 more...]
ger — Petersburg, 1865 A few steps nearer the picket line In behind the shelter Grant determined to bring Sheridan from the Shenandoah, whence the bulk of Early's forces had been withdrawn, and send him to assist Sherman. Sheridan left Winchester February 27th, wreaking much destruction as he advanced, but circumstances compelled him to seek a new base at White House. On March 27th he formed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompte. They charged upon the Confederates, but, at the same time, a galling fire poured into them from the left, spreading dismay and destruction in their midst. The intrepid Sheridan urged his black battle-charger, the famous Rienzi, now known as Winchester, up and down the lines, cheering his men on in the fight. He seemed to be everywhere at once. The Confederate left was streaming down the White Oak Road. But General Crawford had reached a cross-road, by taking a circuitous route, and the So
ger — Petersburg, 1865 A few steps nearer the picket line In behind the shelter Grant determined to bring Sheridan from the Shenandoah, whence the bulk of Early's forces had been withdrawn, and send him to assist Sherman. Sheridan left Winchester February 27th, wreaking much destruction as he advanced, but circumstances compelled him to seek a new base at White House. On March 27th he formed a junction with the armies of the Potomac and the James. Such were the happenings that prompte. They charged upon the Confederates, but, at the same time, a galling fire poured into them from the left, spreading dismay and destruction in their midst. The intrepid Sheridan urged his black battle-charger, the famous Rienzi, now known as Winchester, up and down the lines, cheering his men on in the fight. He seemed to be everywhere at once. The Confederate left was streaming down the White Oak Road. But General Crawford had reached a cross-road, by taking a circuitous route, and the So
: Union, 124 killed and wounded. July 19-20, 1864: Darksville, Stevenson's depot, and Winchester, Va. Union, Averell's Cav.; Confed., Cavalry of Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union2482 killed, 4000 wounded, 2017 missing. Union, Gen. McPherson killed. July 23-24, 1864: Kernstown and Winchester, Va. Union, Portion of Army of West Virginia; Confed., Gen. Early's commaWinchester, Va. Union, Portion of Army of West Virginia; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 1200 killed and wounded; Confed., 600 killed and wounded. July 26, 1864: Wallace's Ferry, Ark. Union, 15th Ill. Cav., 60th and 56th U. S. Colored Troops, Co. E 2d U.South Carolina. On February 17th the city was reluctantly evacuated. August 17, 1864: Winchester, Va. Union, New Jersey Brigade of Sixth Corps and Wilson's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Early's comColored and 2d Kan. Cav. Losses: Union, 38 killed, 48 missing. September 19-22, 1864: Winchester and Fisher's Hill, Va. Union, Sixth, Eighth Corps, and 1st and 2d Divisions of the Nineteen