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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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Junction, August 26, 1862. By a move of unparalleled boldness, Stonewall Jackson, with twenty thousand men, captured the immense Union suples distant to the southwest; and along the Rappahannock, between Stonewall Jackson and Lee, stood the tents of another host which outnumbered the whole Confederate army. Stonewall Jackson had seized Bristoe Station in order to break down the railway bridge over Broad Run, and to p by bullets. It was a full day before the Federals realized that Stonewall Jackson was really there with a large force. Here, in abundance,h a crude barter of belongings as the day wore on. The train Stonewall Jackson and Stuart stopped at Bristoe The train Stonewall JacksStonewall Jackson and Stuart stopped at Bristoe the cavalry. Thus formed, he moved to the front, leaving wagons and moving dust far to our right. At sohere the Federal war department entertained unexpected guests Stonewall Jackson and twenty thousand men were the unexpected guests of the
lle was fought by the Army of the Potomac, and as the success of the raid depended in great measure upon a Federal victory at Chancellorsville, it was not, strategically at least, a success. The detachment of the Union troopers deprived General Hooker of cavalry at a time when he particularly needed a screening force to conceal his movements by the right flank; and it is probable that if Stoneman's cavalry had been present with the Army of the Potomac, it would have given ample warning of Stonewall Jackson's secret concentration opposite the Union right, which well nigh caused a decisive defeat for the Union army. But Stoneman's raid destroyed millions of dollars' worth of Confederate property, and although it cut Lee's communications for a short time only, its moral effect was considerable, as shown by the Confederate correspondence since published. The Stoneman raid was followed in February, 1864, by the famous raid of General Judson Kilpatrick, having as its objective the ta
vast military camp. Prospect Hill became the chief center of cavalry camps during the latter part of the war. Men who tried to catch Mosby: the thirteenth New York cavalry. Guarding the capital — Camp of the thirteenth New York cavalry Stonewall Jackson's famous Valley Campaign, Ashby met his own death, on June 6, 1862. As he fell, his last words to his troopers were: Charge men! For God's sake, charge! Next to the gallant Ashby there was no partisan leader whose death created a gis rumor. He would fall upon an isolated wagon-train at dawn, and by twilight of the same day would strike a Federal Camp thirty miles or more away. But Ashby was a real character, a daring soldier, a superb horseman, and the righthand man of Stonewall Jackson. Careless of the additional danger, he customarily rode a beautiful white horse. After he was captured by the First Michigan cavalry, it was due to the courage and splendid jumping ability of this animal that he was able to make good
his feet. He was a noble animal, high spirited, very intelligent and an excellent horse in every way. He was a stallion and of considerable value. My father used him until after the battle of Chattanooga (November, 1863), as an extra horse Stonewall Jackson's war-horse shortly after his master's death The negative of this picture, made in 1863, not long after the terrible tragedy of General Jackson's death, was destroyed in the great Richmond fire of 1865. The print is believed to be uxiety to seek cover. In 1865, Sherman retired Sam to a well-earned rest, on an Illinois farm, where he received every mark of affection. The gallant warhorse died of extreme old age, in 1884. General Jackson's horses General Thomas J. ( Stonewall ) Jackson, the great Southern leader, had his favorite battle charger, which at the beginning of the war was thought to be about eleven years old. On May 9, 1861, while Jackson was in command of the garrison at Harper's Ferry, a train load of s