Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for December 15th or search for December 15th in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
ate in the war, in the summer of 1864, he was transferred to the Mississippi squadron, keeping the Cumberland River open for the army. The sloop below, attached to the blockading squadron during the war, won quite a name for herself, although not engaged in any of the larger actions, by capturing a number of prizes. In 1861, under Captain C. Green, she caught the blockade-runner Alvarado and took the British vessel Aigburth at sea laden with contraband intended for the Confederacy. On December 15th, of the following year, she captured the ship Havelock and a large brig that was trying to make the coast, laden with cloth and percussion-caps. The Jamestown was ordered to the East Indies September 11, 1862, where she remained till after the war's close. She had a roving commission full of adventure. Admiral S. P. Lee North Atlantic blockading squadron, 1862 A fast sailer the sloop-of-war Jamestown took command of the North Atlantic, guarding the coast of Virginia and North
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
y, except when necessary to concentrate on a special vessel. During the day and night of the 13th, about seven hundred men arrived as reenforcements, making in all about fifteen hundred in the garrison. The bombardment lasted during the 13th and 14th without abatement. The Federal troops landed on the 13th at a point about four miles north of the fort, and nine days supplies were sent ashore with them. The advance on the forts was commenced immediately. When the sun rose on the 15th of December, the streams of shell from the vessels were redoubled, and before noon but one good gun was left on the land face of the fort. By that time the casualties had increased so that the defense had less than twelve hundred men to hold the parapets. Soon after noon a small reenforcement of about three hundred and fifty men, sent by Bragg, succeeded in reaching the works. The defenders could see the assaulting columns getting ready to deliver their attack. A column of sailors and marines w