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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 550 550 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 27 27 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for July, 1863 AD or search for July, 1863 AD in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
eceived $1200 a year. Second lieutenants when on duty at sea received $1200 a year, and when on leave or on other duty received $1000. Surgeons on duty at sea received $2200 and when on other duty $2000 a year. At Richmond, very early in the struggle, a naval school was established by Secretary Mallory and placed under the command of Lieutenant William H. Parker, a former officer of the United States navy, who, at the outbreak of the war, had already seen twenty years of service. In July, 1863, the steamship Patrick Henry, then at Richmond, was converted into a school-ship. She was ordered to remain at anchor off Drewry's Bluff in the James River to lend assistance, if necessary, to the defense of the capital. In the fall of the year the Confederate States Naval Academy was formally opened with an efficient corps of professors. Throughout the exciting times of 1864-65 the exercises of the school were regularly continued, and many of the students gave a good account of thems
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
inally met her end in a storm off Cape Hatteras, December 31, 1862. But before this, her faults of construction had been recognized and the Federal Navy Department had undertaken the construction of nine bigger and better monitors. In Charleston Harbor the monitors were hit an aggregate of 738 times, and proved conclusively their superior endurance. The Lehigh first made her appearance in the James on an expedition and demonstration made up that river by Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee in July, 1863. In September she was attached to Admiral Dahlgren's fleet. From October 26th to November 4th, under Commander A. Bryson, she and the Patapsco were assigned to the special duty of hammering Fort Sumter. On November 16, 1863, she ran aground on Sullivan's Island and was dangerously exposed to the guns of Fort Moultrie for five hours before she could be gotten off. The new sea-elephant of the navy — the Lehigh in 1864 The monitor Lehigh. Ground, but always keeping herself betwe
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
. 35 of her crew killed and wounded. June, 1863. June 3, 1863. Simsport, La., attacked by Federal gunboats. June 10-11, 1863. Attack on Morris Island, Charleston Harbor, by Federal gunboats and troops. June 17, 1863. Capture of Confed. iron-clad ram Atlanta, by monitor Weehawken, in Wassaw Sound, Ga. 180 prisoners taken. June 22-23, 1863. Seven fishing vessels captured off Martha's Vineyard, Mass., by Confed. captured bark Tacony, Lieut. C. W. Read. July, 1863. July 13, 1863. U. S. gunboat Baron DeKalb sunk by Confed. torpedo in Yazoo River, Miss. The Kickapoo The Kickapoo with torpedo-rake ready at the bow: this new weapon of defense was used effectively during the attack on Mobile, on March 28, 1865. The Kickapoo came out safely, although the Milwaukee near-by failed to discover a Confederate torpedo in time and was sunk. August, 1863. August 21, 1863. U. S. brig. Bainbridge foundered. Only 1 man saved. August