Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Cedar Keys (Florida, United States) or search for Cedar Keys (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
son Davis, the Amelia, the Dixie, the Petrel, the Bonita, the James Gray, and many others would A pursuer of many prizes — the Santiago de Cuba This vigilant blockader was one of the first to see active service. As early as December 3, 1861, Commander D. B. Ridgely brought her ten guns to bear upon the schooner Victoria and captured her off Point Isabel on her way to the West Indies with a cargo of cotton. In February of the next year, the Santiago caught the sloop O. K. off Cedar Keys, Florida. The next month she drove a blockade-runner ashore. On April 23, 1862, she captured two schooners and (two days later) a steamer, all on their way from Charleston loaded with cotton. On April 30th she added to her prizes the schooner Maria, and on May 27th the schooner Lucy C. Holmes, both with more cotton; on August 3, 1862, at sea, the steamer Columbia, loaded with munitions of war, and on August 27th the schooner Lavinia with a cargo of turpentine. In 1863 the side-wheel steame