Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) or search for Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
towing lines, and they were making every effort to gain the scene of active fighting. Near Sewell's Point, at the south of the James where the Elizabeth River flows into it, was a heavy Confederate nder Lieutenant-Commander W. N. Jeffers, she led a squadron against the Confederate works at Sewell's Point, and as she engaged them the Virginia ( Merrimac ) came down the river, but the two antagoni it was supposed, until the morrow. The Merrimac and her consorts withdrew to anchorage off Sewell's Point. And so the curtain fell! It would be impossible to exaggerate the feeling of elation ons in Battles and leaders of the Civil war of the vessel's condition as she lay at anchor off Sewell's Point: The armor was hardly damaged, though at one time our ship was the focus on which were dunning aground, the Merrimac did not follow, and at about two o'clock, turned her bow toward Sewell's Point. It was a few minutes after noon when the Monitor made for the shallow water, and Lieuten
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
oria, in which the subjects of Great Britain were forbidden to endeavor to break a blockade lawfully and effectually established. May 18-19, 1861. Shots exchanged between U. S. S. Freeborn and Monticello and the Confed. battery at Sewell's Point, Va. U. S. S. Harriet Lane arrives off Charleston. May 26, 1861. U. S. S. Brooklyn commenced the blockade of the Mississippi River. Blockade of Mobile, Ala., commenced by U. S. S. Powhatan. May 28, 1861. U. S. S. Minne were finally silenced. During the latter part of the war he was successively in command of the Tenth and Nineteenth Army Corps. April 11, 1862. Confed. steamers Merrimac, Jamestown, and Yorktown, came down between Newport News and Sewell's Point, on the Chesapeake, and captured 3 vessels. April 14, 1862. Potomac flotilla ascended the Rappahannock River, destroying several batteries. Three vessels were captured. Foote's mortar-boats opened fire on Fort Pillow, on the Mis