Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Hawkes or search for Hawkes in all documents.

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all went: Come and get your quinine, quinine, quinine; come and get your quinine—quii-ni-ine! The Seventy-second New York took part in the battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863, and in the pursuit of Lee, and did duty along the line of the Rappahannock till October of that year. Its wounded were many, and the surgeons' duties were exacting during battle and for days thereafter. An army doctor in the field C. K. Irwine, surgeon of the seventy-second New York infantry September, 1863 Surgeon Hawkes, fiftieth New York engineers cotton-warehouse near the river, commodious, thoroughly clean, and well arranged in every way. The had here about two hundred and fifty patients, mostly chronic cases, two assistant surgeons, a hospital steward, a one-armed hospital clerk, about twenty convalescents as nurses, and a matron—the wife of one of the assistant surgeons. After the battle of Chickamauga, to revert to an earlier period of the war, the Confederate wounded were treated for weeks
all went: Come and get your quinine, quinine, quinine; come and get your quinine—quii-ni-ine! The Seventy-second New York took part in the battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863, and in the pursuit of Lee, and did duty along the line of the Rappahannock till October of that year. Its wounded were many, and the surgeons' duties were exacting during battle and for days thereafter. An army doctor in the field C. K. Irwine, surgeon of the seventy-second New York infantry September, 1863 Surgeon Hawkes, fiftieth New York engineers cotton-warehouse near the river, commodious, thoroughly clean, and well arranged in every way. The had here about two hundred and fifty patients, mostly chronic cases, two assistant surgeons, a hospital steward, a one-armed hospital clerk, about twenty convalescents as nurses, and a matron—the wife of one of the assistant surgeons. After the battle of Chickamauga, to revert to an earlier period of the war, the Confederate wounded were treated for weeks