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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

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led and bewildered. It may have been the fact that they were fooled once too often that made some of these generals so skeptical they would not believe their own officers, eye-witnesses to the presence of the foe in force, as when Jackson circled Pope and dashed upon his communications at Manassas; when Longstreet loomed up against his left at Second Bull Run, and when Jackson again circled Hooker and Howard and crushed the exposed right flank at Chancellorsville. Be that as it may, there is necter of Southern superiority in numbers unnerved the young leader, and the story of thousands of Southern reenforcements drove him to the change of base and the shelter of the gunboats on the James. A few weeks later and the same tactics told on Pope and his subordinates. Old Jack was at their heels or on their flanks, with sixty thousand men—the flower of the Southern infantry, said prisoners who had ridden, apparently accidentally, into the Federal lines. Guarding Federal army supplie
h rifles and the 10-pound Parrotts. During the first year, before the blockade became stringent, Whitworth guns were brought in from abroad. But that soon stopped, and we had to look largely to Uncle Sam for our supply. We used to say in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign, of 1862, that General Banks was General Jackson's quartermaster-general—yes, and his chief ordnance officer, too. General Shields was another officer to whom we were much indebted for artillery and small arms, and later General Pope. General Gorgas, Chief of the Confederate Ordnance Bureau, stated that from July 1, 1861, to Jan. 1, 1865, there were issued from the Richmond arsenal 323,231 infantry arms, 34,067 cavalry arms, 44,877 swords and sabers, and that these were chiefly arms from battlefields, repaired. But these sources of equipment sometimes failed us, and so it came to pass that some of our regiments were but poorly armed even in our best brigades. For instance the Third Brigade in Ewell's corps, one of
ng tables and their colored servants, at Bealton, Virginia, the month after Gettysburg. But in the last photograph a soldier is cowering apprehensively over the fire at Culpeper, Virginia, in August, 1862, while the baffled Army of Virginia under Pope was retreating before Lee's victorious northward sweep. The busy engineers stop to eat Preparing a meal in winter-quarters: the company cook with his outfit in action—beef on the hoof at hand Cooking out-of-doors Officers' luxurythe month after Gettysburg. But in the last photograph a soldier is cowering apprehensively over the fire at Culpeper, Virginia, in August, 1862, while the baffled Army of Virginia under Pope was retreating before Lee's victorious northward sweep. The busy engineers stop to eat Preparing a meal in winter-quarters: the company cook with his outfit in action—beef on the hoof at hand Cooking out-of-doors Officers' luxury at Bealton—August, 1863 A mouthful during Pope's re
d get the uncouth but unbothersome blouse. Regiments that long had paraded in leggings or gaiters kicked themselves loose and left the relics strung out from Mechanicsville to Malvern. When next they came trudging out toward Manassas, to join John Pope and his hard-hammered army, many men had learned the trick of rolling the trousers snug at the ankle, and hauling the gray woolen sock, legging-wise, round them. There was a fashion that endured to the last, and spread westward and southward tperiod—notably Sherman, Thomas, McPherson, Stanley, and by them they enthusiastically swore. They had lost Halleck, Pope, Grant, and Sheridan, as they proudly said, sent to the East to teach them Western ways of winning battles, but Halleck and Pope had hardly succeeded, and Grant and Sheridan were yet to try. They had as yet lost no generals of high degree in battle, though they mourned Lytle, Sill, Terrill, W. H. L. Wallace, and Bob McCook, who had been beloved and honored. They were desti