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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 14 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 14 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Jetersville (Virginia, United States) or search for Jetersville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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iles of dubious country. It was nip and tuck whether Yank or Reb first laid hands on him, and when he finally reached the wearied leader, and, rousing to the occasion, Grant decided to ride at once through the darkness to Sheridan's side, and set forth with only a little escort and the scout as guide, two staff-officers, thoroughly suspicious, strapped the latter to his saddle, linked his horse with theirs, and cocked their revolvers at his back. That scout rode those long miles back to Jetersville with these words occasionally murmured into his ears, At the first sight or sound of treachery, you die. Not until they reached Sheridan at midnight were they sure it was not a device of the desperate foe. Volumes could be written of the Secret Service of the Union armies—what it cost and what it was really worth-but the South, it is believed, could more than match every exploit. Serious as was this problem, there were others beyond that of the strategy of a campaign of even greater m