hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

other than those obtained from the country as he advanced, Grant carrying no personal baggage himself but a toothbrush. Sherman, who protested most vigorously against this hazardous movement, nevertheless later on applied the lesson it taught him when on his march to the sea, in 1864, he broke through the hollow shell of the Confederacy and closed it in from the South, while Grant advanced from the North, and crushed the armies of Lee and Johnston. the surrender of the Southern armies in April and May, 1865, put an end to military activities, to be succeeded by the contests in the forum of political discussion; the death of Lincoln and the succession of Johnson following so immediately upon the surrender of Lee threw the whole question of the readjustment of political relations between the North and the South into chaos. In spite of his desire and his effort to keep within the limitations of his military function, General Grant found himself involved in the embittered contests of
troops in the wintry trenches around Petersburg. Lee and his staff as the war ended: men who stayed through Appomattox. These twelve members of General Robert E. Lee's staff surrendered with him at Appomattox Court House, and with him signed a parole drawn up by Grant, to the effect that they would not take up arms against the United States until or unless they were exchanged. This military medallion was devised by the photographer Rockwell during General Lee's stay in Richmond in April, 1865. These facts are furnished by Major Giles B. Cooke (No. 12, above), who had verified them by writing General Lee himself after the surrender. Late in March and early in April, the Federals made Lee's position untenable, and he pressed on to Amelia Court House, where the expected supplies failed him, Richmond having meanwhile surrendered on April 3, 1865. Grant, drawing near, sent Lee on April 7th a courteous call to surrender. Lee, still hoping against hope for supplies, asked Gran
d the Army and corps leaders who ended the war in the northwest and southwest As Sherman cut the southeastern Confederacy in two by his march to the sea, so Sheridan (center of group above) and Canby (shown below) wiped off the map the theaters of war in the northwest and southwest respectively. With Merritt and Torbert, and the dashing Custer, Sheridan swept the Shenandoah Valley. Canby, as commander of the military division of West Mississippi, directed the Mobile campaign of March-April, 1865, which resulted in the occupation by the Federals of Mobile and Montgomery. A raid by James H. Wilson (second from right) had prepared the way for this result. In May, 1865, Canby received the surrender of the Confederate forces under Generals R. Taylor and E. Kirby Smith, the largest Confederate forces which surrendered at the end of the war. The cavalry leaders in the upper picture are, from left to right: Generals Wesley Merritt, David McM. Gregg, Philip Henry Sheridan, Henry E. Davi
e operations around Mobile that resulted in its capture, April, 1865. After the war, Major-General Granger was mustered out arch to the sea and through the Carolinas (November 1864–April 1865) were so known. This force was commanded by Major-Generis conspicuous gallantry at the battle of Spotsylvania. In April and May, 1865, he had command of the Second Corps. General successful, especially his raid into North Carolina, in April, 1865. He was retired from the regular army with the rank of in command of the Second Corps, and from March, 1864, to April, 1865, of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac; after which hen various capacities, and finally as head of the corps from April to June, 1865. In 1866, he resigned from the volunteer serl Gordon Granger, took part in the capture of Mobile, in April, 1865. The corps was discontinued at Galveston, Texas, July 2discontinued in January, 1866. He occupied Richmond, in April, 1865. After commanding a district in Texas, he was mustered
Reserves. After Johnston was wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31st, Major-General Smith, who was leading the left wing, took command of the whole army, but was stricken by illness the following day and was succeeded by General Lee. In August, he took charge of the defenses of Richmond and was acting Secretary of War in November. In February, 1863, he resigned from the service, and on June 1, 1864, took command of the Georgia Militia. He was captured by Major-General J. H. Wilson at Marion in April, 1865. He died in New York, June 24, 1896. Lieutenant-General, Richard Stoddert Ewell (U. S.M. A. 1840) was born in Georgetown, District of Columbia, February 8, 1817, and served with distinction in the Mexican War. He joined the Confederate army in 1861, and was made major-general the following year. He fought as brigade and division commander with the Army of Northern Virginia, and was given command of the Second Corps after the death of Lieutenant-General T. J. Jackson, being made li
terans of the Union armies had begun to be formed. The first veteran society formed, The Third Army Corps Union, was organized at the headquarters of General D. B. Birney, commander of the Third Army Corps, at a meeting of the officers of the corps, September 2, 1863. The main object, at that time, was to secure funds for embalming and sending home for burial the bodies of officers killed in battle or dying in hospitals at the front. General D. A. Sickles was its first president. In April, 1865, the Society of the Army of the Tennessee was formed at Raleigh, North Carolina, membership being restricted to officers who had served with the old Army of the Tennessee. The object was declared to be to keep alive that kindly and cordial feeling which has been one of the characteristics of this army during its career in the service. General Sherman was elected president in 1869, and continued to hold the office for many years. After the war, many other veteran societies were formed