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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 769 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 457 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 436 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 431 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 371 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 295 5 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 277 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 234 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 203 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 180 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Hooker or search for Joseph Hooker in all documents.

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he breeze on the crest of Lookout Mountain. Eager hands pointed, and a great cheer went up from the Army of the Cumberland. They knew that the Union troops with Hooker had carried the day in their battle above the clouds. That was the 25th of November, 1863; and that same afternoon the soldiers of Thomas swarmed over the crestrk B. Lagow. The figure in the right foreground is Colonel William S. Hillyer. Seated by the path is an orderly. They have evidently come to survey the site of Hooker's battle from above. Colonel Lagow is carrying a pair of field glasses. Less than four months later Grant was commissioned lieutenant-general and placed in genet distinguished in our Civil War; a relatively higher place than Jefferson Davis, James Longstreet, William J. Hardee, and others of the South; and than Sheridan, Hooker, Buell, and other leaders of the Northern armies. no soldier of like rank was more distinguished in the War with Mexico than Grant, then a lieutenant. It is n
read of narrative. Burnside superseded McClellan, and Lee, with the support of Longstreet and Stonewall Jackson, encountered him at Fredericksburg, where, on December 13, 1862, the Federals suffered one of the most disastrous defeats of the war. Hooker succeeded Burnside and began operations well by obtaining at Chancellorsville a position in Lee's rear. Then came the tremendous fighting of May 2 and 3, 1863, followed by Hooker's retreat across the Rappahannock on the 6th. The Confed- Lee iHooker's retreat across the Rappahannock on the 6th. The Confed- Lee in Richmond after the war The quiet distinction and dignity of the Confederate leader appears particularly in this group portrait—always a trying ordeal for the central figure. Superbly calm he sits, the general who laid down arms totally unembittered, and set a magnificent example to his followers in peace as he had in war. Lee strove after the fall of the Confederacy, with all his far-reaching influence, to allay the feeling aroused by four years of the fiercest fighting in history. This p
leader of a division in the Fourteenth Corps. John Newton led the Second division of the Fourth Corps. Alpheus S. Williams, leader of a division under General Joseph Hooker. Edward M. McCook, dashing leader of a Cavalry division in front of Atlanta. Wager Swayne, originally Colonel of the 43d Ohio, brevetted Major-General.es and divisions which fought under McPherson, Thomas and hooker in the campaign for Atlanta, summer of 1864 Thos. H. Ruger commanded a brigade under General Hooker. J. C. Veatch, division leader in the Sixteenth Army Corps. Morgan L. Smith, leader of the Second division, Fourteenth Corps. J. D. Cox commanded a divtillery on Sherman's staff. W. W. Bella, promoted in front of Atlanta. John B. Turpin, leader in the Fourteenth Corps. William T. Ward led a Ivision under Hooker. John W. Sprague, leader in the Sixteenth Corps. offensive policy but was severely defeated in several battles during the latter days of July and in August.
raded tobacco for sugar and coffee, and frequently visited each other across the narrow stream. A Confederate officer riding along the bank visiting his outposts was often saluted by a picket across the river, within easy gunshot. Similar compliments passed between pickets in gray and officers in blue. These soldiers were testifying their respect for each other, with little idea, on the part of the Confederates, that they would ever again be fellow countrymen. eventually both generals, Hooker and Lee, issued orders strictly forbidding all intercommunication. Just after these orders, an incident occurred which the writer long ago gave to the newspapers in the hope, which proved vain, that he might hear from the Union soldier. A Confederate officer Federal generals killed in battle group no. 4 Brevet Brig.-Gen. James A. Mulligan, Winchester, July 26, 1864. Brig.-Gen. Thos. G. Stevenson, Spotsylvania, May 10, 1864. Brevet Maj.-Gen. Thomas A. Smyth, Farmville, A
A. E. Burnside to January 26, 1863; Major-General Joseph Hooker to June 28, 1863, being succeeded brness campaign and siege of Petersburg. Joseph hooker, commander of the Army of the Potomac durioming successively under command of Major-General Joseph Hooker, Brigadier-General George G. Meade, by Brigadier-General F. J. Porter, Major-General Joseph Hooker, Brigadier-General Daniel Butterfie part in the campaigns of McClellan, Burnside, Hooker, and Pope. At Fredericksburg, he had command Charleston Harbor, and the other two went with Hooker to Tennessee to assist Grant in the Chattanoogs gallant defense of Culps' Hill, it went with Hooker to Tennessee where one division opened the linof the Eleventh and Twelfth corps which, under Hooker, had joined the Army of the Cumberland in OctoGeorgia. The corps commanders were Major-Generals Joseph Hooker, Henry W. Slocum, Joseph A. Mower, rigadier-General J. B. Ricketts and Major-General Joseph Hooker. On the discontinuation of the Arm[5 more...]
1865. Gilmore, Q. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Granger, Gordon, Mar. 13, 1865. Granger, Robt. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Grierson, B. H., Mar. 2, 1867. Griffin, Charles, Mar. 13, 1865. Grover, Cuvier, Mar. 13, 1865. Hardie, James A., Mar. 13, 1865. Harney, Wm. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Hartsuff, G. L., Mar. 13, 1865 Hatch, Edward, Mar. 2, 1867. Hawkins, J. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Hazen, Wm. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Heintzelman, S. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Hoffman, Wm., Mar. 13, 1865. Holt, Joseph, Mar. 13, 1865. Hooker, Joseph, Mar. 13, 1865. Howard, O. O., Mar. 13, 1865. Howe, A. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Humphreys, A. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Hunt, Henry J., Mar. 13, 1865. Hunter, David, Mar. 13, 1865. Ingalls, Rufus, Mar. 13, 1865. Johnson, R. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Kautz, August V., Mar. 13, 1865. Ketchum, Wm. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Kilpatrick, Judson, Mar. 13, 1865. King, John H., Mar. 13, 1865. Long, Eli, Mar. 13, 1865. McCook, A. McD., Mar. 13, 1865. McDowell, Irvin, Mar. 13, 1865. McIntosh, John B., Aug. 5,