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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 10 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pender or search for Pender in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
turned to Cashtown. General Hill arrived with Pender's division in the evening, and the following m Heth then prepared for action, and as soon as Pender arrived to support him, was ordered by Generalontest with a superior force, were relieved by Pender's, and Early coming up by the Heidlersburg roath, slightly, and Brigadier-General Scales, of Pender's division, severely wounded. The enemy retmmettsburg road, making an angle with Ewell's. Pender's division formed his left, Anderson's his riguested Brigadier-General Lane, then commanding Pender's division, to co-operate on the right of Rodend officers was large. Maj.-Generals Hood and Pender, Brigadier-Generals Jones, Semmes, G. T. Andere, were wounded — the last two mortally. Generals Pender and Semmes died after their removal to Vinforced by Heth's division and two brigades of Pender's, to the command of which Major-General Trimbwhose defence they fell. The loss of Major-General Pender is severely felt by the army and the co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E. Bodes' report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
my front. The rest of the men, generally, was only disturbed by the occasional skirmishing and desultory firing of the opposing sharp-shooters, but Daniel's brigade, which had been, early in the morning, moved by my orders so as to connect with Pender's division on the crest of the ridge before spoken of, was subjected to a galling artillery fire, especially in the afternoon. Late in the afternoon, however, an attack was made upon the enemy's position by some troops of the right wing of the adiately sought General Early, with a view of making an attack in concert with him. He agreed with me as to the propriety of attacking, and made preparations accordingly. I hastened to inform the officer commanding the troops on my right (part of Pender's division) that in accordance with our plan I would attack just at dark, and proceeded to make my arrangements; but having to draw my troops out of town by the flank, change the direction of the line of battle, and then to traverse a distance of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General B. E. Rodes' report of the battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
e epaulements on the heights. At this juncture a portion of Iverson's brigade, and a portion of Pender's troops, under the immediate command of Brgadier-General Pender, coming up, he ordered them allGeneral Pender, coming up, he ordered them all forward. The enemy was compelled to abandon the barricade and fall back, and pressing on, Colonel Hall's two regiments, the Fifth and Twenty-sixth Alabama, together with Twenty-third North Carolina -sixth Alabama, fell desperately wounded. In the mean time the residue of Rodes', Iverson's and Pender's troops moving forward to the left of Hall and Christie, were met and repulsed by the enemy, thrdon, of the Sixth Alabama, a young officer of great promise and great purity of character. General Pender, in speaking of the first advance of my troops, stated to me that Colonel Christie and his rles was subsequently thrown across the road, and at an angle of 45° with it, connecting with General Pender, by whom this line was continued on to the left. Colston's division, now attached to my com
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General A. P. Hill's report of battle of Gettysburg. (search)
divisions of Major-Generals Anderson, Heth and Pender, and five battalions of artillery, under commah Pegram's battalion of artillery, followed by Pender, with McIntosh's battalion of artillery--Colon, Pettigrew and Brokenbrough on the right, and Pender formed in his rear; Thomas on the left, and La, and thus formed a right angle with my line. Pender's division was then ordered forward — Thomas' d. On the second, then, my position was this: Pender's division occupying the crest from the Theolo line with Anderson's division and the half of Pender's, now commanded by General Lane, and to orderPettigrew, and Lane's and Scale's brigades, of Pender's division, to report to Lieutenant-General Loeral Trimble reported to me for the command of Pender's division, and took the command of the two bron's division crossed without molestation, and Pender's was in the act of crossing when the enemy marrest our march. Heth's division (his own and Pender's) was leading. General Benning's brigade of [1 more...]