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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 356 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 317 5 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 224 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 223 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 202 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 172 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 155 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sterling Price or search for Sterling Price in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorandum of information as to battles, &c., in the year 1864, called for by the Honorable Secretary of War. (search)
ecent statement of a Federal general (Naglee) has been published, which states that General Grant's losses in killed, wounded, prisoners and missing, amounted to 150,000 men. The Confederate loss probably amounted to 30,00. August to October 14 Battles at Reams' Station, Staunton River Bridge, Davis' Farm or Weldon Railroad, Fort Gilmer and the Darbytown road, in which the enemy have probably lost in killed, wounded and prisoners, 10,000. Confederate loss probably 3,500. October Price's success in Missouri. General Early reported successes in Valley, between Fisher's Hill and Strasburg, and near Thornton Gap. In addition to the foregoing, a large number of cavalry successes have been achieved by Forrest, Hampton, Wheeler, Morgan and Rosser, and brilliant partisan operations performed by Lieutenant-Colonel Mosby, resulting in the capture of many prisoners and much property from the enemy. May to September Battles between the Army of Tennessee, under General Johnston
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of the Elkhorn campaign. (search)
rived at headquarters with dispatches from General Price, then in Boston mountains in northwest Arkansas. General Price related that after his victory at Springfield, or Oakhill, he had been forced t Louis depended mainly upon these commands of Price and McCulloch for success, Van Dorn at once seent specimen of manhood in its prime, than Sterling Price presented to the brave Missourians, who lo our way over the mountain ridge which divided Price's camp from that of the Texans under General Mign, enabled Van Dorn to organize the corps of Price and of McCulloch into an army of about 16,000 my's defences in the front. By two o'clock, Price had forced the enemy back along his whole line where the enemy's had been in the morning. Price's corps had been hotly engaged from 10 A. M. tch, McIntosh and Hebert were killed, while General Price and many others were wounded, and our losslen on the enemy's rear with all the forces of Price and McCulloch, the disasters of the day would [9 more...]