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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The relative strength of the armies of Generals Lee and Grant. (search)
some time. This state of facts may account for General Badeau's mistake, as it can be explained on no other hypothesis. Neither Stanton nor Grant have given any estimate of the loss of the army of the latter in this memorable campaign, but Mr. Swinton, who was a regular correspondent of a New York paper, in constant attendance with the Army of the Potomac, and who has published a history of the campaigns of that army, says, on pages 491-92 of his book: Grant's loss in the series of acme; but I have a printed copy of a letter written to the New York Tribune in June, 1867, which gives statements taken from the returns of the Confederate armies on file in said Archive office, which letter is understood to have been written by Mr. Swinton, the author of The Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. I send that copy to you, in order that you may verify, by an examination of it, all my statements; and, if I appear a little prolix and tedious, I beg you to be patient, as I desire to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
there is a copy of General Lee's report of the Pennsylvania campaign and the battle of Gettysburg. This report was furnished to the Historical magazine by Mr. William Swinton, who says that it chanced to be on the person of one of General Lee's staff-officers at the time of the destruction of his headquarters papers on the retreainformed by him that he had received a copy of the report as published, and he said that the report was substantially correct, though he was at a loss as to how Mr. Swinton got possession of it. He stated that the report as prepared for the Adjutant-General at Richmond was with his other papers in the headquarters wagons on the ret to be with some of his own papers which he had with him on the retreat and at the time of the surrender, and thus escaped destruction; and that he loaned it to Mr. Swinton shortly after the close of the war, who, he supposed, copied it while in his possession, and was thus enabled to furnish the copy to the Historical magazine.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
(October 4th, 1867), to Colonel C. A. White; Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 413. Despite these on despair refused longer to obey his orders. Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 487; Draper, vol. It Cold Harbor, which was but a few hundreds. Swinton (p. 494) says that the Army of the Potomac loons the Executive had in consequence come. Swinton, p. 495, note. But, alas! the success elsewhf the Potomac, was left in like ignorance, Swinton, pp. 499 and 503-506. and General Grant, hurruld ride over them --a representation, says Mr. Swinton archly, not justified by his experience, anmy confess to a loss of more than 10,000 men Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 514.--a fact which aenvelop the right flank of the Confederates. Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 512. Action of t of Southern Historical Society, April, 1875. Swinton (A. P., p. 539.) puts the Federal loss above of the James. Nor was Hill on the field, as Swinton and Childe represent. Both largely overstate[9 more...]