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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 64 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 38 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 33 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ing towards Fredericktown, thus interposing itself between him and our forces. He accordingly marched northward, through Rockville and West-minister, to Hanover, Pennsylvania, where he arrived on the 30th, but the enemy advanced with equal rapidity on his left, and continued to obstruct communication with our main body. Supposing from such information as he could obtain that part of the army was at Carlisle, he left Hanover that night, and proceeded thither by way of Dover. He reached Carlisle on the 1st July, when he received orders to proceed to Gettysburg. He arrived in the afternoon of the following day and took position on General Ewell's left. untered and repulsed a body of the enemy's cavalry at Hunterstown endeavoring to reach our rear. General Stuart had several skirmishes during his march, and at Hanover quite a severe engagement took place with a strong force of cavalry, which was finally compelled to withdraw from the town. The prisoners taken by the cavalry
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
ommunicate with him as early as practicable after crossing the Potomac, and place my command on his right flank. It was expected I would find him in York. The newspapers of the enemy, my only source of information, chronicled his arrival there and at Wrightsville, on the Susquehanna, with great particularity. I therefore moved to join him in that vicinity. The enemy's army was moving in a direction nearly parallel to me. I was apprized of its arrival at Taneytown, when I was near Hanover, Pennsylvania, but believing from the lapse of time that our army was already in York or at Harrisburg, where it could choose its battleground with the enemy, I hastened to place my command with it. It is believed that had the corps of Hill and Longstreet moved on instead of halting near Chambersburg, that York could have been the place of concentration instead of Gettysburg. This move of my command between the enemy's seat of Government and the army charged with its defence, involved serious los