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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
with that Army of Northern Virginia which met and mastered army after army, baffled McClellan, and destroyed successively Pope, Burnside and Hooker; which twice invaded the enemy's country, and which, when at last against it was thrown all the resous with many of that brilliant band, and prove himself the master of each in turn, of McClellan, of Burnside, of Hooker, of Pope, of Meade, of Grant, of whomsoever could be found to lead them by the millions he confronted. When the war of secession by blows which sent McClellan in hopeless rout to the shelter of his shipping, thence to hurry as he might to the rescue of Pope's bewildered divisions, and to organize home guards in the defences of Washington. That single Campaign of the seven dness the audacity of detaching Jackson from the Rappahannock line to seize Manassas Junction and the road to Washington in Pope's rear. Witness the magnificent swoop on Harper's Ferry, of which accident gave to McClellan the knowledge and by which t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Lexington, Kentucky (formerly of General Stuart's staff), a package of Mss. containing the following: General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations of his cavalry, from October 30th, 1862, to November 6th, 1862. An original letter from Major-General John Pope to Major-General Banks, dated July 21st, 1862, enclosing dispatch from Brigadier-General Rufus King, at Falmouth (giving account of his raid on Beaver Dam depot), and ordering Banks to send General Hatch at once to make cavalry raid on Gl J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations of his cavalry, from October 30th, 1862, to November 6th, 1862. An original letter from Major-General John Pope to Major-General Banks, dated July 21st, 1862, enclosing dispatch from Brigadier-General Rufus King, at Falmouth (giving account of his raid on Beaver Dam depot), and ordering Banks to send General Hatch at once to make cavalry raid on Gordonsville, Charlottesville, &c. (This letter was probably found when Stuart captured Pope's headquarters).
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nation on our discussion of the prison question. (search)
ave enjoyed to an even greater extent had the United States authorities been willing to accept the humane proposition of our Commissioner of Exchange — to allow each side to send supplies to their prisoners. But why did not the Confederacy furnish better rations to both our own soldiers and our prisoners? and why were the prisoners at Andersonville not supplied with wheat bread instead of corn bread? Answers to these questions may be abundantly found by referring to the orders of Major-General John Pope, directing his men to live on the country ; the orders of General Sherman, in fulfilling his avowed purpose to make Georgia howl as he smashed things generally in that great march, which left smoking, blackened ruins and desolated fields to mark his progress; the orders of General Grant to his Lieutenant, to desolate the rich wheat-growing Valley of Virginia; or the reports of General Sheridan, boasting of the number of barns he had burned, the mills he had destroyed, and the large