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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Duck River (Tennessee, United States) or search for Duck River (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee's report of the Tennessee campaign, beginning September 29th, 1864. (search)
, my command leading the advance and marching in the direction of Columbia via Henryville and Mount Pleasant. I arrived in front of Columbia on the 26th, relieving Forest's cavalry then in position there, which had followed the enemy from Pulaski. The force of the enemy occupying Columbia was two corps. They confined themselves to the main works around the city, and their outposts and skirmishers were readily driven in. On the night of the 27th the enemy evacuated Columbia and crossed Duck river. Stevenson's division of my corps entered the town before daylight. After crossing, the enemy took a strong position on the opposite side of the river and entrenched, his skirmishers occupying rifle pits 250 yards from the river. There was considerable skirmishing across the river during the day, and some artillery firing, resulting in nothing of importance. On the morning of the 29th Johnson's division of my corps was detached and ordered to report to the General Commanding. I was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Carter L. Stevenson of the Tennessee campaign. (search)
had been fired before their arrival. In the fort at Columbia we secured a large amount of howitzer and small arm amunition and two siege howitzers. Colonel Butler had immediately upon gaining possession of the town sent a force to the ford of Duck river. The enemy's skirmishers were found to be in large force on the opposite bank and the enemy in position behind works about three-quarters of a mile from the river. He immediately moved down his command, and skirmished with them briskly. The s drove them back from the immediate bank of the river. Orders were soon after received to discontinue the skirmishing. On the night of that day, General Hood, with Cheatham's and Steuart's corps and Johnson's division of Lee's corps, crossed Duck river some miles above Columbia, and pushed for the enemy's rear, leaving General Lee, with Clayton's and my division to occupy the enemy in front until he should have reached his position, then to force a crossing of the river and attack the enemy a