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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 185 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 94 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 80 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 75 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Edward Johnson or search for Edward Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
ith him on an expedition into Northwestern Virginia in the spring, to wit: the Twenty-second Virginia of General Sam. Jones' command, the Twenty-fifth Virginia of Johnson's division, and the Thirty-first Virginia of my division, all of which had returned to their respective commands. He had the Sixty-second Virginia regiment, callce. Ewell could not do so when the Commanding-General was present. If he had gone forward with his less than 8,000 men that were available before the arrival of Johnson, he could not have shattered the Twelfth corps--possibly portions of two others; and as our position was perfectly in view from Cemetery hill, and all our movemen on our right, released the several thousand prisoners we had taken, and destroyed our trains, as there would have been nothing in our rear to oppose him. When Johnson arrived, which was after six P. M., the opportunity for taking the heights without a desperate and uncertain struggle had passed, as Generel Hancock's statement m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
which I have just alluded, and occupied by the division of General Edward Johnson (Ewell's corps), and had directed a second line to be constin the counter-movement. Towards the dawn of day on the 12th, General Johnson discovered indications of an impending assault upon his front.s the cause, probably, of the order to withdraw the artillery from Johnson's front. It was withdrawn in the early part of the night, and soon after, Johnson's videttes reported the enemy massing in his front. He selected and sent to the front his most reliable scouts; these returned soon and confirmed the report previously made. General Johnson reported at once the condition of affairs in his front, and made a requesthe dense woods to the different positions prepared for them. General Johnson was present on his lines, and had remained there from the timeeference to the withdrawal of the artillery and its return, is General Johnson's own version as given to me by himself on two different occas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ad ceased. One brigade of it (Wilcox's) and a battery were placed on picket one and a quarter miles south of the Chambersburg road, near a mill on Marsh creek. Johnson's division of Ewell's corps reached the field a little before dark; Hood and Kershaw's divisions of Longstreet's corps during the night, and bivouacked east of Mall the time on him. I did not order General McLaws forward, because, as the head of the column, he had direct orders from General Lee to follow the conduct of Colonel Johnson. Therefore, I sent orders to Hood, who was in the rear and not encumbered by these instructions, to push his division forward by the most direct route, and tngstreet seeks to throw the responsibility of this delay in getting his troops into position on General Lee, because he had ordered McLaws' division to follow Colonel Johnson; in other words, that General Lee had taken command of one of his divisions through a staff officer: and yet, if he really believed this, he violated instruct
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General S. McGowan of battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
a sharp angle in the works near a brick kiln, opposite to which the enemy had established a battery. I threw the sharpshooters into a wood to our front and right to pick off the gunners and horses. There we remained until about 9 o'clock A. M., when I was directed to march with my brigade and report to General Ewell, who directed Major-General Rodes to put me in on the right of his line to support General Harris and assist in filling up the gap which had been made by the capture of Major-General Johnson and a part of his command. At this place our line of works made a sharp angle, pointing towards the enemy, which angle the enemy held in great force, besides having the woods and ravine in front occupied by multitudes, who seemed to be as thick as they could stand. The right of my brigade extended some distance up the left side of the angle, and rested on nothing but the enemy, who held the point and some portion (I never knew how much) of the right side of the angle. Besides ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wilderness. (search)
a sharp angle in the works near a brick kiln, opposite to which the enemy had established a battery. I threw the sharpshooters into a wood to our front and right to pick off the gunners and horses. There we remained until about 9 o'clock A. M., when I was directed to march with my brigade and report to General Ewell, who directed Major-General Rodes to put me in on the right of his line to support General Harris and assist in filling up the gap which had been made by the capture of Major-General Johnson and a part of his command. At this place our line of works made a sharp angle, pointing towards the enemy, which angle the enemy held in great force, besides having the woods and ravine in front occupied by multitudes, who seemed to be as thick as they could stand. The right of my brigade extended some distance up the left side of the angle, and rested on nothing but the enemy, who held the point and some portion (I never knew how much) of the right side of the angle. Besides ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
ich we have not yet published, so that our Papers may contain the full official history of the Confederate operations in that great campaign. Report of General Edward Johnson. headquarters Johnson's division, September 30th, 1863. Major — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division fJohnson's division, September 30th, 1863. Major — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from June 15th to July 31st, 1863, embracing the campaign in Pennsylvania and battle of Gettysburg. My division comprised the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-Gen-J. A. Walker, consisting of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Nadenbousch, Major Terry, Colonthe operations around Gettysburg were-- Killed,219 Wounded,1,229 Missing,375   Total,1,823 I am, Major, with great respect, your obedient servant, Edward Johnson, Major-General. Report of Major-General H. Heth. headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
Anglo-Saxon race. Great men never die, Their bones may sodden in the sun, Their heads be hung on castle gates and city walls, But still their spirits walk abroad. Again, gentlemen, permit me to thank you for your kind remembrance of the Army of Tennessee, and to again assure you that it is a pleasure to meet you to-night. Then followed a number of volunteer toasts, which were in turn happily responded to by Colonel James Lingan, President of the Louisiana Division, Army of Tennessee Association; Dr. Carrington, late of the Confederate States navy; Colonel F. R. Farrar ( Johnny Reb ), of Amelia; General Fitz. Lee; Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond; Major R. W. Hunter, of Winchester, formerly of the Staff of General Edward Johnson, and General John B. Gordon, and General J. A. Early, who always brings down the house. The whole occasion was indeed a joyous one, which renewed many glorious memories and revived hallowed associations which we would not willingly let die.