hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 24 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stepen Lee or search for Stepen Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Chickasaw bayou. (search)
General S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Chickasaw bayou. [The following report of a gallant fight has never been in print, so far as we know, and we are glad to be able to lay it before our readers.] headquarters Lee's brigade, Vicksburg, Miss., January, 1863. Major — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the troops under my command during the recent conflict with the enemy, resulting in his abandoning his attack upon the city of Vicksburg. The nclosed is a list of casualties--36 killed, 78 wounded, 3 deserted — total, 124. Major-General Maury arrived on the morning of the 30th and assumed command. The report of my future operations will be sent through him. Please find enclosed reports of Colonels Withers, Higgins, Thomas and Morrison. I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. D. Lee, Major-General C. S. A., commanding on Yazoo. Major J. G. Deveraux, A. A.-G., Second District, Departments Mississippi and E.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second battle of Manassas--a reply to General Longstreet. (search)
assas--a reply to General Longstreet. By General S. D. Lee. In the June number of the Southern H above, the following official report of Colonel S. D. Lee, made to Colonel R. H. Chilton, General * * * * * * * * * Respectfully submitted, S. D. Lee, Col. Art'y C. S. A., Comd'g Batt'n Light Ar appears that the artillery battalion of Colonel S. D. Lee was on the ridge between Jackson and Lonxtract from his official report, as also Colonel S. D. Lee's official report — in which he treats ong thrown forward about the same time by Colonel S. D. Lee, under their well-directed fire the suppleft. This was the position occupied by Colonel S. D. Lee's four batteries of eighteen guns on theng thrown forward about the same time by Colonel S. D. Lee, under their well-directed fire, the supsissippi, December, 1862, thus speaks of General S. D. Lee, who commanded the batteries on the ridgrt, speaking of the 30th: During the day Colonel S. D. Lee with his reserve artillery was placed in[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg — the battle on the right. (search)
ttle field. I believe in responsibility for human conduct, and although the Federals greatly outnumbered the Confederates, yet the disparity was not so great as on many other fields where the latter had been completely victorious. The army under Lee was. never much stronger numerically, nor its condition better than at Gettysburg. The rank and file were never more confident of success. I therefore conclude that some one blundered. Modesty would dictate to me silence in the discussion of thtion I happened to occupy on the field, I do know some facts which have an important bearing on the question of responsibility for the failure of the Confederates to win the battle. The campaign may have been an unwise or ill advised one, but General Lee, in his nobleness of soul, put that question beyond discussion by assuming, more than was chargeable to him, the entire responsibility of the failure. General Early, Colonel Taylor and others have charged General Longstreet with the loss of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery at Second Manassas-General Longstreet's reply to General S. D. Lee. (search)
he artillery at Second Manassas-General Longstreet's reply to General S. D. Lee. Gainesville, Georgia, September 6th, 1878. Southern His In your issue of last month a paper appears from the pen of General S. D. Lee, claimed to be a reply to a part of my official report of thes personal relations between General R. E. Lee and myself. General S. D. Lee seems to have started from erroneous premises, therefore, andhat field, seems to meet the only real point of issue made by General S. D. Lee. I have to ask, therefore, that you give it a place in your your letters of 10th and 18th of this month. I have not seen General S. D. Lee's communication to the Southern Historical Society Papers, buLee's report of the battle of second Manassas: The battalion (S. D. Lee's battalion light artillery) received. orders on the evening of evere and successful artillery duel. During the day (30th) Colonel S. D. Lee, with his reserve artillery placed in the position occupied t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery at Second Manassas--Rejoinder of General S. D. Lee to General Longstreet. (search)
The artillery at Second Manassas--Rejoinder of General S. D. Lee to General Longstreet. In the November number of the Southern Historical Society Papers is the following letter of General Longstreet's, supplemented by one from Colonel J. B. Wa78. Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia: In your issue of last month a paper appears from the pen of General S. D. Lee, claimed to be a reply to a part of my official report of the second battle of Manassas as published in an article llustrate, as well as might be, the official as well as personal relations between General R. E. Lee and myself. General S. D. Lee seems to have started from erroneous premises, therefore, and may mislead some of your readers. The inclosed accnder of the Washington artillery of New Orleans upon that field, seems to meet the only real point of issue made by General S. D. Lee. I have to ask, therefore, that you give it a place in your Papers whenever it may be convenient. I am, very re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson — the story of his being an Astrologer refuted — an eye-witness describes how he was wounded. (search)
to drag himself more than twenty steps; but Captain Lee had the litter at hand, and his strength beto that flank. I started at once, reaching General Lee before day, and remaining with him by his ofind a correct account of my interview with General Lee in Dabney's Life of Jackson, pages 701 and tain Hotchkiss--though Captain H. did reach General Lee about an hour or two after I had made my report. When he arrived and began to tell General Lee of the wounding of General Jackson, General LeGeneral Lee checked him, saying, I know all about it, and do not wish to hear any more — it is too painful a , or something to that effect. When I told General Lee about it, he made me sit by him on his bed, About the time I had finished relating it, General Lee came out, booted and spurred, and ordered hhis was just before day. I started off with General Lee, but he made me go back, and told me to liewhat he witnessed. The interview between General Lee and Captain Wilbourn, when the latter commu[1 more...]