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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 278 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 202 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 140 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 115 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 53 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lafayette McLaws or search for Lafayette McLaws in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
s Ferry, and subsequently formed a portion of his division. Page 75. Crouch's division, Fourth corps, Army of the Potomac, should be Couch's division. Page 85. Detailing the operations embracing Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg and the Plank Road, &c.: Meantime, Sedgwick had forced Early out of the heights at Fredericksburg, &c., &c. While this is true, the impression made may be a little variant from the truth. The heights when captured by Sedgwick were held by Barksdale's brigade of McLaws' division; this, however, was at the time under General Early. Page 98. Second day's battle at Gettysburg on the right, and late in the afternoon: The two divisions of Longstreet's corps gallantly advanced, forced the enemy back a considerable distance and captured some trophies and prisoners. True; but there were three brigades of Anderson's division of Hill's corps that were engaged, and as conspiciously as any of Longstreet's, and accomplished as much in proportion to their strength a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
the directing brigade, or that I was to guard McLaws' flank. No brigade commander of Anderson's diofford's brigades, or in truth for any part of McLaws' division. As to the second charge, that of This does not show that my brigade uncovered McLaws' left any more than it does that he uncovered e to bring off any of the captured artillery. McLaws' left also fell back. * * * General Longstre meant that Wright and Wilcox and the left of McLaws fell back in the order mentioned, he is incorrreet was ordered to place the two divisions of McLaws and Hood on the right of Hill, partially enveleft. An examination of the map will show that McLaws was not opposite the enemy's left, but that hen. General Kershaw, commanding a brigade in McLaws' division. of Longstreet's corps, after descrThe reports of other commanders of brigades of McLaws' and Hood's divisions, when published, may thre left brigades of the division. The order of McLaws' advance was Kershaw's brigade, followed by Se[17 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg — the battle on the right. (search)
f the Federals. We were allowed but a few minutes' rest, when the divisions of McLaws and Hood were moved in line by the right flank around to the south of the Federvering the movement from the enemy. Finally, Hood marched across the rear of McLaws and went into line on the crest of a little ridge, with Benning's brigade in rend line — his battalion of artillery, sixteen pieces, in position on his left. McLaws then formed his division of four brigades in two lines of battle on Hood's left, and with sixteen pieces of artillery in position on McLaws' left. This line was in the general direction of the Emmettsburg road and nearly parallel with it — thnce was in two lines or a double line of battle. I presume this was true as to McLaws' division and a portion of Hood's; but there was no line in rear of Law's brigar was given General Hood to advance upon the enemy, and hurrying to the head of McLaws' division, I moved with his line. What business had he, a corps commander, to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding of Stonewall Jackson — extracts from a letter of Major Benjamin Watkins Leigh. (search)
P. Hill's divisions — that is to say, all of Jackson's corps, except Early's division — marched from the vicinity of Hamilton's crossing to a point on the Plank road, about eight miles westward of Fredericksburg. Early's division was left to watch a body of the enemy who had crossed the Rappahannock at a point opposite to Hamilton's crossing, whilst the rest of the corps marched towards Chancellorsville, where the enemy's main force had been concentrated. The greater part of Anderson's and McLaws' divisions had been driven from their positions near Chancellorsville by the advance of the enemy,. and we were marching to the support of those divisions. * * * * * * * * * Saturday the 2d I found General A. P. Hill with his staff at a point about three-fourths of a mile from Chancellorsville. General Lee, General Anderson, General Pender, and a number of general officers were here. There was some skirmishing going on in our front and several minnie balls from the enemy's skirmishers