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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ng us papers themselves, or in informing us to whom we may write for such papers. If we fail to publish a full discussion of all of the great battles of the West, it will be only because of the failure of the gallant men who made those fields illustrious to furnish us the material. General Geo. D. Johnston, General agent of our Society, whose work in Nashville, Memphis, Jackson and Clarksville, Tennesse, was so successful, expects to begin operations in Louisville and other parts of Kentucky in a few days. A gallant soldier, an accomplished gentleman and a graceful speaker, General Johnston needs no introduction from us; and yet the friends of our good cause can greatly lighten his labors, and help us if they will give him their hearty co-operation. General J. C. Brown, ex-Governor of Tennessee, has kindly consented to deliver an address in the interest of our Society at the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs about the 7th of August (the exact day will be announced in du
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Mr. Swinton's history of the Army of the Potomac that General Longstreet opposed the invasion of the North, and from his recent contributions to the Weekly Times that he urged an active and aggressive campaign in the Southwest, in Tennessee and Kentucky. On his return from the Suffolk expedition he called on the Secretary of War, in Richmond, and found him engaged in devising a scheme for the relief of Vicksburg, around which General Grant was beginning to concentrate his forces. He dissenteddisastrous nature of the battle of Gettysburg to the Confederates, may be made apparent. Now, in regard to the plan of campaign agreed upon after General Lee had patiently listened to Longstreet's theory of operations, embracing Tennessee and Kentucky, but did not adopt, though admitting, according to General Longstreet, that his idea was new and that he thought much of it. Of this plan of campaign and the discussions that preceded its adoption, if there were any, we know absolutely nothing,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate career of General Albert Sidney Johnston. (search)
rt Sidney Johnston. A Review by General Basil W. Duke, of Kentucky. [In addition to our brief notices of Colonel Williamern and Central railroad; also the military operations in Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas and the Indian country immediately west be hurled rapidly from this base upon any portion of Northern Kentucky. Forts Henry and Donelson were relied upon to close touth a ruinous feeling of confidence and security. Seven Kentucky regiments were also organized during the winter. The tro the field every other effective soldier in Tennessee and Kentucky, had for the defence of his whole line 31,000 men. Speaki followed like a bloodhound close upon Bragg's trail into Kentucky; the audacious determination with which he marched his deainst Bragg, and shoved that distinguished officer out of Kentucky, gave him a high reputation with his opponents. Other Felaration of a profound strategic conviction. The line in Kentucky once forced, it was impossible for the retreating army to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
to force this misrepresentation of facts into history. The census of 1860 shows that the fourteen States from which the Confederacy drew any part of its forces had a white population of only 7,946,111, of which 2,498,891 belonged to Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, which three States furnished more men (because of force of surrounding circumstances) to the Federal than to the Confederate armies; so that the total population upon which the Confederacy could draw was really only 5,447,220, while the United States had (exclusive of Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri) a population of 19,011,300. Add to this the patent facts that we soon lost large portions of our territory — that the United States recruited very largely from our negro population, and that by means of large bounties and other inducements the Federal armies drew from the dense populations of Europe a very large proportion of their levies, and it will be seen that the odds against us must to have been enormous. As for Gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Presentation of Army of Tennessee badge and certificate of membership to ex-president Davis. (search)
remnant of the gallant little band, who had offered themselves a willing sacrifice on the altar of their country, and went to that torture, mental and physical, which any of you who had the misforture to be a prisoner know how to estimate. Close by in time and space was another example of patriotic and soldierly devotion, which you will not value the less for not having been crowned with victory — the defence of Fort Donelson, on which depended the possibility of holding our line in Southern Kentucky and the safety of Nashville. Relying on constitutional guarantees and restrictions, the South had not prepared for the war before taking the step which led to it. Therefore it was not possible to supply you with the clothing and shelter needful in the extraordinary cold and sleet, nor to garnish the work you defended with an armament and munitions at all comparable to that of your assailants; yet to the world it is known, and will long be remembered, how gallantly you held the posit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual meeting of Southern Historical Society, October 28th and 29th, 1878. (search)
Annual meeting of Southern Historical Society, October 28th and 29th, 1878. In the absence of Hon. J. S. C. Blackburn, of Kentucky, who had been prevented by unforseen engagements from fulfilling his promise to deliver our annual address, the Society was very fortunate in securing the services of Rev. Dr. J. L. Burrows, of Louisville, Kentucky, a resident of Richmond during the war. The hall of the House of Delegates was crowded with fair women and brave men, and scattered through the au Agencies. We are satisfied that if we could secure reliable and efficient canvassers in every State we could soon swell our membership by thousands. General George D. Johnston, of Alabama, has, in a canvass of four months in Tennessee and Kentucky, demonstrated what can be done in this direction, and Colonel Z. Davis, of South Carolina, has done efficient work in his State. In conclusion, we would express our increasing sense of the importance of the work committed to our charge, an