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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Chickasaw bayou. (search)
d the previous day by Colonel Withers, but now by the Twenty-eighth Louisiana volunteers (Colonel Allen Thomas), being at least a brigade and a battery of six guns. Colonel Thomas held his ground agaColonel Thomas held his ground against this greatly superior force from about daylight till 12 M., when he retired in good order. The enemy were highly elated by their success and followed rapidly, but a volley from the Twenty-sixth ending a force to my left flank. This force was soon met by the Twenty-eighth Louisiana, Colonel Allen Thomas, and the Forty-second Georgia, Colonel Henderson, sent to the left in the morning, and hand in repulsing him when my right flank was threatened; his dispositions were excellent. Colonel Allen Thomas, Twenty-eighth Louisiana, exhibited great gallantry, and with his regiment did splendid s operations will be sent through him. Please find enclosed reports of Colonels Withers, Higgins, Thomas and Morrison. I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. D. Lee, Major-Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
ptured, the enemy, in a confused mass, surged along the right face, swept up Steuart's brigade, and had gotten somewhat in rear of the left of Lane's brigade, when it was withdrawn promply to the short, unfinished line on the crest in rear. The enemy was caught in the angle between the two lines, and after being subjected to a close and sharp fire in flank and somewhat in enfilade, were expelled from this part of the lines with serious losses in killed and wounded. Lane was reinforced with Thomas' and Scales' brigades of my division, but after he had driven the enemy out of the lines. Two brigades of Anderson's division (Perrin's and Harris') and McGowan's brigade of my division were sent to recapture the salient. The first to reach the vicinity of the salient was the Alabama brigade of Perrin. This was rushed ahead under a terrible fire of musketry, drove the enemy from the short, unfinished line in rear of the salient, and General Perrin fell shot dead from his horse as he leape
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate career of General Albert Sidney Johnston. (search)
the advance of the Federal forces by inducing the belief that the Confederates were preparing for aggression. This condition of things, however, could not last long. Forty-eight thousand men were collected in the Federal armies under Buell and Thomas, and heavy forces were massing at Cairo under Grant, C. F. Smith and McClernand, to attack Donelson and Henry. This movement, if successful, would lay open the road to Nashville, force the evacuation of Bowling Green and Columbus, and isolate and risk the loss of. Memphis. On the 19th of January the first shock of arms was felt, on the left flank, at Fishing Creek, where the Confederate General George B. Crittendon was defeated by Thomas and forced to a disastrous retreat. The United States Government, determined to improve success, rapidly reinforced Buell, and he, in turn, reinforced Grant. On the 2d of February the Federal movement up the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers was commenced. The only reinforcement Johnston could obta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General S. McGowan of battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
l Ewell, then in sight. The brigades of Generals Lane and Thomas advanced some distance. My brigade was formed perpendicul absence of General Wilcox (who was with Generals Lane and Thomas) ordered me to return at once to the Plank road. As the fof the brigade in to drive them back, where they found General Thomas engaging them. It was now sundown, and this portion of the brigade remained with General Thomas all night. The remaining portion was massed on the road to the left of General TGeneral Thomas. Night closed in and the firing ceased, both sides retaining the ground on which they had fought. In this charge td see, I sent for the portion of the brigade left with General Thomas and formed line of battle at an angle with the Plank rdirection from which they had come. At the request of General Thomas, who was to my right and already nearly cut off, I advd confusion up the road in my rear. A moment after, I saw Thomas rolling up from the right and also passing in my rear, pre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wilderness. (search)
l Ewell, then in sight. The brigades of Generals Lane and Thomas advanced some distance. My brigade was formed perpendicul absence of General Wilcox (who was with Generals Lane and Thomas) ordered me to return at once to the Plank road. As the fof the brigade in to drive them back, where they found General Thomas engaging them. It was now sundown, and this portion of the brigade remained with General Thomas all night. The remaining portion was massed on the road to the left of General TGeneral Thomas. Night closed in and the firing ceased, both sides retaining the ground on which they had fought. In this charge td see, I sent for the portion of the brigade left with General Thomas and formed line of battle at an angle with the Plank rdirection from which they had come. At the request of General Thomas, who was to my right and already nearly cut off, I advd confusion up the road in my rear. A moment after, I saw Thomas rolling up from the right and also passing in my rear, pre