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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 196 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 48 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 26 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Round Top or search for Round Top in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
the Emmettsburg road and the foot of the ridge ending in Round Top on the Federal left on the 2d, and but few are seen thereook to be Hood's division, halted in the road in sight of Round Top, and had sent back to Longstreet for orders. For some reute over which to lead them so as not to be seen. He saw Round Top, and then knew that further effort at concealment would b forward a number of his best scouts and ascertained that Round Top could be turned, the enemy attacked in rear and flank, anroad. General Hood sent a second request to let him turn Round Top, and again he answered--General Lee orders us to attack u that he had not been permitted to attack in flank around Round Top, and that Longstreet replied, we must obey the orders of fact that up to the time of the advance of Hood, neither Round Top nor Little Round Top were occupied by the enemy, nor had my of Northern Virginia. Had Hood been permitted to turn Round Top he would have captured the enemy's principal See Roche
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg — the battle on the right. (search)
scent and halted in line with my regiment on Round Top. The Fourth Alabama was to the left of the Fly down the northern or northeastern side of Round Top without encountering any opposition whatevero suddenly and mysteriously disappeared from Round Top, had evidently fallen back to a second line tes engineers, it has been demonstrated that Round Top is 116 feet higher than Little Round Top — tifest that if General Longstreet had crowned Round Top with his artillery any time that afternoon, were posted on Round Top. The importance of Round Top as a point d'appui was not appreciated untilrren both say ensued to drive the enemy from Round Top, was had with the two Alabama regiments alonbama about the time we reached the summit of Round Top; there certainly was a wide gap between thosere were no Confederate troops on the top of Round Top during the engagement, except the Fifteenth Second. That the Federals did not occupy Round Top until after sunset, and probably not until a[16 more...]