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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
e's crossroads, as the Federals call it, will not be forgotten, where the battle was fought and a pursuit of sixty miles made all in thirty hours. The first invasion of A. J. Smith into Mississippi. That you may appreciate the immense work Forrest was now doing, besides keeping about thirty thousand men constantly engaged to watch him, I call attention to the following telegrams from General Sherman. His telegram from Nashville, dated April 4, 1864, to General Rawlings, shows that General Corse was sent up Red river to bring A. J. Smith with all dispatch to Vicksburg and up the Yazoo river and rapidly occupy Grenada. His appearance there, with ten thousand men, will be a big bombshell in Forrest's camp, should he, as I fear he will, elude General Hurlbut. At Grenada, Smith will do all the mischief he can, and then strike boldly across the country by Aberdeen to Russellville and Decatur. This movement was defeated by the victory over Sooy Smith and the advance into Middle Ten
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
scertained to be retiring from A. P. Hill's front. We prepare to move. Move in the afternoon by Dickerson's to the Mud Tavern, and thence down the Telegraph road, Ewell preceding us. Hill takes a western road. The supply trains and heavy baggage wagons moving via New Market, Chilesburg and Island Ford. We march all night, halting on the Telegraph road at 3 A. M. on the 22d. After two hours rest the march is resumed. The head of our column reaches the Northanna at 12.15 P. M., May 22d. Corse's and Kemper's brigades, Pickett's division, join us. Barton with Hill's column temporarily. Troops are put in bivouac on the south side of Northanna. May 23d Enemy reported advancing down Telegraph road. Our line is formed. The guard on the north side of the river is driven across. In the afternoon we sustain a severe cannonade, and have a chimney knocked over our party. At night the line is somewhat retired. Pickett reports to Hill. May 24th Day occupied in examining and i