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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 20 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
hundred miles from the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, with which a long line of wagon communication had to be maintained. To push on to Staunton, with Jackson on his flank and rear, was virtually to sacrifice his present line of communication, with no practicable substitute in view; to attack the Confederates on the slopes of the mountains, with even a greatly superior force, was to risk defeat. On the 28th of April Jackson applied to General Lee, then acting as Commander-in-Chief under President Davis, for a reinforcement of five thousand men, which addition to his force he deemed necessary to justify him in marching out and attacking Banks. Next day he was informed that no troops could be spared to him beyond the commands of Ewell and of Edward Johnson, the latter of whom was seven miles west of Staunton, at West View, with a brigade. Jackson at once decided upon his plan of campaign, and the very next day began to put it in execution. This campaign, so( successful and brill
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
of Wright's brigade.Gettysburg, July, 1863. On the morning of the 1st of July moved my brigade from its camp, near Fayetteville, Pennsylvania, in the direction of Gettysburg. Between 4 and 5 o'clock P. M. the brigade reached a position near Gettysburg, where it remained until next morning. About seven o'clock on the morning of the 2d of July, I received orders to move my brigade by the right flank, following Perry's brigade, and occupied a position (on Seminary Ridge) previously held by Davis' brigade of Heth's division. About twelve o'clock I was informed by Major-General Anderson that an attack upon the enemy's line would soon be made by the whole division, commencing on our right by Wilcox's brigade, and that each brigade of the division would begin the attack as soon as the brigade on its immediate right would commence the movement. I was instructed to move simultaneously with Perry's brigade on my right, and informed that Posey's brigade on my left would move forward upon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The death of Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
nces, all his glorious campaigns around McClellan's rear on the Peninsula, beyond the Potomac, and upon the Rapidan, quoting from his orders and issuing new ones to his couriers, with a last injunction to make haste. About noon, Thursday, President Davis visited his bedside, and spent some fifteen minutes in the dying chamber of his favorite chieftain. The President, taking his hand, said, General, how do you feel? He replied, Easy, but willing to die, if God and my country think I have fu dirge and anthem by the choir. Among the pall-bearers we noticed Brigadier-General John H. Winder, General George W. Randolph, General Joseph R. Anderson, Brigadier-General Lawton and Commodore Forrest. Among the congregation appeared President Davis, General Bragg, General Ransom, and other civic and military officials in Richmond. A portion of the funeral services according to the Episcopal church was read by Rev. Dr. Peterkin, assisted by other ministers, concluding with singing and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
e none of the battle reports later than May, 1863, published by the Confederate Congress; many of the reports for 1864-5 had never been sent to the War Department, and hence the great deficiency. But we are satisfied that many of these reports are still scattered through the country in the hands of the officers who prepared them or of others, and we beg our friends to make diligent inquiries and to endeavor to secure them for us. Remember that where parties are unwilling to surrender originals, we will receive them as a loan until copies can be made both for our office and the Archive Bureau in Washington. A Chromo of the inauguration of President Davis at Montgomery, well executed from a photograph taken at the time, has been presented us by the general agent, Mr. Joseph Hurd, Prattesville, Ala., from whom it can be obtained. It is said to be from the only photograph of that important event extant, and many will be glad to preserve in their homes this historical picture.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last telegrams of the Confederacy. (search)
The last telegrams of the Confederacy. The following were among the last telegrams ever sent by President Davis or the Secretary of War. We have the originals, written in pencil and in the autographs of these distinguished leaders, and shall preserve them in our archives as memorials of those last sad days which closed our g the terms of agreement when notified by you of the readiness on the part of the General Commanding the United States forces to proceed with the arrangement. Jefferson Davis. Official: M. H. Clark, Chief Clerk Executive Office. Charlotte, N. C., April 24, 1865. General J. E. Johnston, Greensboroa, N. C. The President has wri General B. Bragg, Charleston, S. C.: I hope even the small force with you will be effective in preventing those irregularities to which I suppose you refer, and that your presence will secure good administration, now so important in the care and transportation of supplies. I expect to join you in a few days. Jefferson Davis.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Harris concerning an incident at the battle of the Wilderness. (search)
Report of General Harris concerning an incident at the battle of the Wilderness. Headquarters brigade, December 2d, 1864. Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson: General — Your note, inquiring about an incident which happened on the evening of the sixth of May last, in the Wilderness, during the advance of my brigade, is received. The main facts related by you are true. The enemy were moving by the flank with the apparent intention of getting in rear of the brigades of Davis, Perry and Law, when my brigade suddenly encountered them. They halted, came to a front and fired one volley, which wounded Colonel Manlove and four or five of my men. My command then fired, gave a yell and charged, driving the enemy with ease, killing thirty or forty, including one colonel, one lieutenant-colonel, a captain and inspector of ordnance on General Burnside's staff; wounding many and capturing ninety or one hundred, including one colonel. Hoping this incomplete narration of facts will pr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hampton's report of the battle of Trevylian's depot and subsequent operations. (search)
, and the two brigades were thrown on the flank of the enemy. At the same moment the whole line, under the immediate command of Major-General Fitz. Lee, charged the works of the enemy, who, after fighting stubbornly for a short time, gave way, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. This advance of our troops was made in the face of a very heavy fire of artillery and musketry and it was most handsomely accomplished. As soon as the enemy gave way I brought up the Phillips and the Jeff. Davis legions, mounted, ordering them to charge. This they did most gallantly, driving the enemy for three miles in confusion. Robbins' battalion and the Twelfth Virginia cavalry were mounted and participated in a part of this charge, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Massie, commanding the latter, was wounded, whilst gallantly leading his men over the works of the enemy. The enemy were completely routed and were pursued to within two and one-half miles of Charles City Courthouse — the pursuit lastin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
ollowing: A campaign with sharpshooters, by Captain John D. Young; A Ruse of war, by Captain John Scott; Confederate negro enlistments, by Edward Spencer; Fire, sword and the Halter, by General J. D. Imboden; Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis, by J. H. Reagan; General Stuart in camp and Field, by Colonel J. E. Cooke; Lee and Grant in the Wilderness, by General C. M. Wilcox; Lee in Pennsylvania, by General James Longtreet; Lee's West Virginia campaign, by General A. L. Lon Death of General John H. Morgan, by H. V. Redfield; General Meade at Gettysburg, by Colonel James C. Biddle; General Reynolds' last battle, by Major Joseph G. Rosengarten; Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg, by Major J. E. Carpenter; How Jefferson Davis was overtaken, by Major-General Wilson; Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid, by Colonel J. E. McGowan; On the Field of Fredericksburg, by Hon. D. Watson Rowe; Recollections of General Reynolds, by General T. F. McCoy; Some recollections o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ambliss, who had made a charge — I know not by whose orders — and whoa was falling back before a large force of the enemy. The First North Carolina and the Jeff. Davis legion were sent by Colonel Baker, and these two regiments drove back the enemy, but in their eagerness they followed him too far and encountered his reserve in hee Cobb legion) and Fitz. Lee's brigade charging. In the hand-to-hand fight which ensued, as I was endeavoring to extricate the First North Carolina and the Jeff. Davis legion, I was wounded, and had to leave the field, after turning over the command to Colonel Baker. The charge of my brigade has been recently explained to me a I had made of my command contemplated an entirely different plan for the fight, and beyond this disposition of my own brigade, with the subsequent charge of the First North Carolina and the Jeff. Davis legion, I had nothing whatever to do with the fight. I am, Major, very respectfully, yours, Wade Hampton, Brigadier-Gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
g a good brigade; while the only infantry in the Department was Echols' brigade at Union Draught, in Monroe county, and Wharton's brigade at the Narrows of New River--twenty-six miles north of Dublin. Such was the disposition when information was received that General Crook was advancing in the direction of Dublin, with a strong force, from the Kanawha. General Breckinridge was engaged in preparations to receive him, when, on the evening of the 4th of May, he received a telegram from President Davis, saying that Siegel was advancing up the Shenandoah Valley on Staunton, and that the indications were that he (Breckinridge) would have to go at once to meet him, closing with directions to communicate with General Lee. A dispatch was sent General Lee the same night, informing him of the attitude in the Department and asking instructions. Early on the morning of the 5th of May--the day on which the battle of the Wilderness was fought — an answer was received from General Lee, directin
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