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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ruggles' amended report of the battle of Shiloh. (search)
ht them into action, and directed their fire on masses of the enemy then pressing forward towards our right engaged in a fierce contest with our forces then advancing against him in that direction. [I directed my staff officers at the same time to bring forward all the field guns they could collect from the left towards the right as rapidly as possible, resulting in the concentration of the following batteries, commencing on the right and extending to the left: First. Captain Trabue's Kentucky. Second. Captain Burns' Mississippi. Third. Lieutenant Thrall's section of Captain Hubbard's Arkansas. Fourth. Captain Sweat's Mississippi. Fifth. Captain Triggs' and Sixth. Captain Roberts' Arkansas. Seventh. Captain Rutledge's. Eighth. Captain Robinson's (twelve-pounder Napoleon guns) Alabama. Ninth. Captain Stansford's Mississippi. Tenth. Captain Bankhead's Tennessee. Eleventh. Captain Hodgson's Washington artillery, Louisiana, extending in succession to the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the campaign of 1864 in Virginia. (search)
ance to overwhelm the foe, now tottering on the verge of ruin. The assailing force is not supported. They reach the limit of endurance; their progress ceases. At length, assailed in flank, they sullenly retire. And now, after the almost superhuman exertions which they have put forth, those frowning lines still confront them; that coveted prize, the road to Richmond, is still in possession of the foe. The victory which they have gained becomes a shadow in their grasp; but the glory which they have won neither disaster nor overthrow, nor years of humiliation and suffering, nor time itself, can ever dim. Many a day of toil and night of watching, many a weary march and tempest of fire, still await those grim and ragged veterans; but they have taught the world a lesson that will not soon be forgotten, and have lighted up the gloom of that dark forest with a radiance that will abide so long as heroism awakens a glow of admiration in the hearts of men. W. F. Perry. Glenndale, Kentucky.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An alleged proclamation of President Lincoln. (search)
His support at the North, in the event of war, he regarded as uncertain, and anarchy appeared inevitable. In this condition of affairs commissioners appointed by Governor Pickens, of South Carolina, appeared on the scene, and through Judge Campbell, then late of the Supreme Court, who had resigned on the secession of Louisiana, commenced a negotiation for the surrender to that State of the Government forts and property within its limits. The commissioners were also aided by Dr. Todd, of Kentucky, a brother of Mrs. Lincoln, who was in harmony with the views and actions of the South Carolinians. He was a temporary habitant at the White House, and acquired information in a private way that no one could have obtained in an official capacity, and which was made use of as time and circumstances required. The negotiations of South Carolina with the Government failed — not because of an indisposition to entertain the proposition submitted, but on account of the precipitate action of Sout
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
liam Preston, of Lexington, has been elected Vice-President of our Society for Kentucky, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of General S. B. Buckner, who wrostons, and we doubt not that we have committed the interests of the Society in Kentucky into most worthy hands. The Kentucky Branch of the Southern Historical Storical material relating to the Confederate war as can be secured in the State of Kentucky. It shall be located at Lexington, Kentucky, and shall hold meetings aization, with local associations at Louisville, Lexington, and other points in Kentucky, it would be best, but we are entirely willing to leave the matter to the good judgment of our friends in Kentucky. And we confidently look for such practical co-operation as shall not only extend our membership, and circulate our publications in Kentucky, but bring us also important contributions to our archies, and especially valuable material for a history of the war in the West and Southwest. We hop
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Bragg's proclamation on entering Kentucky. (search)
General Bragg's proclamation on entering Kentucky. The following should go on the record and be preserved with the material for the future historian : headquarters of Department no. 2, Glasgow, Ky., September 18, 1862. Kentuckians — I lies must be had for my army, but they shall be paid for at fair and remunerating prices. Believing that the heart of Kentucky is with us in our great struggle for constitutional freedom, we have transferred from our own soil to yours, not a band our gallant Buckner leads the van. Marshall is on the right, while Breckinridge, dear to us as to you, is advancing with Kentucky's valiant sons to receive the honor and applause due to their heroism. The strong hands which, in part, have sent Shiloheer us with the smiles of your women and lend your willing hands to secure you in your heritage of liberty. Women of Kentucky: Your persecutions and heroic bearing have reached our ear. Banish henceforth, forever, from your minds the fear of loat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Instructions to Hon. James M. Mason--letter from Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, Secretary of State, C. S. A. (search)
lions two hundred and forty-four thousand people. This territory, large enough to become the seat of an immense power, embraced not only all the best varieties of climate and production known to the temperate zone, but also the great staples of cotton, tobacco, sugar and rice. It teems with the resources, both moral and physical, of a great empire, and nothing is wanted but time and peace for their development. To these States there will probably be added hereafter Maryland, Missouri and Kentucky, whose interests and sympathies must bind them to the South. If these are added, the Confederate States will embrace eight hundred and fifty thousand square miles of territory and twelve and a half millions of people, to say nothing of the once common Territories west of these States, which will probably fall into the new Confederacy. Is it to be supposed that such a people and with such resources can be subdued in war when subjugation is to be followed by such consequences as would resul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.61 (search)
ite House. Not only Democrats, but Republicans are protesting against a draft to swell an army to fight to free negroes, and are declaring more boldly for State-rights and the Union as it was. Many say the draft cannot and shall not be enforced. The Democracy are beginning to learn that they must endure persecution, outrage and tyranny at the hands of the Republicans, just as soon as they can bring back their armed legions from the South. They read their own fate in that of the people of Kentucky,Missouri and Maryland. They are beginning to lean more on the side of our people as their natural allies and as the champions of State-rights and of popular liberty. Many of them would gladly lock arms with our soldiers in crushing their common enemy, the Abolitionists. Many of them would fall into our lines if our armies occupied any States north of the Ohio for a month, or even a week. Many of them are looking to the time when they must flee their country, or fight for their inalienab
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragrpahs. (search)
alled around them their sisters, and went to work so vigorously that in October, 1866, they dedicated Stonewall Cemetery, and announced that they had collected and buried in it the bodies of 2,494 Confederate soldiers. They have continued to improve the cemetery, until it is now one of the most beautiful in the land. Each State has its own section, and the dead from Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Kentucky are all arranged in well kept graves, each one of which is marked with a neat headboard; and in the center of each section is a wooden shaft, appropriately inscribed to the fallen heroes of that particular State. Each section is under the charge of a committee of ladies, who vie with each other in honorable rivalry for the proper care of our graves. The plan is that each State shall substitute this wooden shaft by one of marble or granite, appropriately carved and inscribed, and when th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
ing affairs in his Department. From Richmond he was summoned hastily by the announcement that Burbridge was moving from Kentucky with a heavy force through Pound gap, to the attack of Saltville. He reached Abingdon in time to direct the concentratier, near its middle, General Stoneman advanced from East Tennessee with a heavy cavalry force, while Burbridge came from Kentucky, the two effecting a junction and capturing Abingdon before meeting with any serious resistance. They also subsequentlying to Canada in the fall of 1868, he found the sectional feeling so far abated that his friends counseled his return to Kentucky, and in the succeeding winter, having received assurances that he would not be molested, he returned to New York. His arrival in Kentucky, shortly afterwards, was hailed with every demonstration of affection by his former neighbors, irrespective of antecedents, and with cordial welcome by the whole State. He constantly rebuked any effort to make any formal parade in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
ennessee would have been sooner occupied, and Kentucky and Missouri might never have been lost to oution of artillery, and as our army moved into Kentucky, was ordered to assist in protecting its leftGeneral A. S. Johnston, for active service in Kentucky, his welldrilled army at Pensacola, and to refirst week of March, 1864, a small brigade of Kentucky infantry, seven hundred effective, under Genemined at once to move into West Tennessee and Kentucky, to annoy the enemy and recruit his command, especially his new Kentucky brigade. In ten days he mounted his new brigade, and on the 15th of Mare quantity of supplies were obtained, and his Kentucky brigade increased to seventeen hundred fighti is in your command, only the matter involves Kentucky also. As soon as he is disposed of, I will lith and the advance into Middle Tennessee and Kentucky. A little later A. J. Smith was ordered to aneral Webster at Nashville: Call forward from Kentucky any troops that can be spared there, and hold