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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 71 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
the upper Rappahannock and was concentrating at Fredericksburg. This movement of McDowell had released Ewell,n to replace one sent to McClellan, now lies at Fredericksburg, impatient to take part in the movement on Richorce, is detached at New Market, and ordered to Fredericksburg to swell McDowell's corps to over 40,000 men. son's plans. Upon the march of Shields towards Fredericksburg, General J. E. Johnston, commanding in-chief in the latter's corps should be sent forward from Fredericksburg towards Richmond, were listened to. Shields wasPresident Lincoln and Secretary Stanton went to Fredericksburg to confer with General McDowell, found that Shilegraph to leave his least effective brigade at Fredericksburg, See McDowell's testimony. in addition to thhe rest of his forces remain for the present at Fredericksburg. We are sending such regiments and dribs from alyze the movements of McDowell's 40,000 men at Fredericksburg, and to cause the concentration of half of this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ruggles' amended report of the battle of Shiloh. (search)
it belongs, but who have had counter claims raised by the reports of other Generals. He is especially pleased that you have corrected material discrepancies in the report of General Polk. I am, General, your obedient servant, J. Stoddard Johnston, A. D. C. Official: R. M. Hooe, A. A. G. Endorsement. headquarters army of Tennessee, Tallahoma, Tennessee, April 21st, 1863. Respectfully forwarded with the request that this be substituted for Brigadier-General Ruggles' report. The facts he states are not within my personal knowledge, as I was at the time on a distant part of the field, but he is sustained by his subordinate commanders and a mass of other testimony, and justice to his command entitles his request to consideration. Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Official: J. Stoddard Johnston, A. D. C. Official: R. M. Hooe, A. A. G. I hereby certify that the foregoing are copies of official records. Daniel Ruggles. Fredericksburg, Virginia, March 25th, 1875.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the campaign of 1864 in Virginia. (search)
etween General Grant and his objective point. The arrival of Longstreet's corps and Anderson's division defeated the plan of Grant, and threw him on the defensive. The effort of General Lee was still to come. The plan of attack was made known by officers of the staff to the brigade commanders on the left. It was to throw a force upon the flank and rear of Hancock, and at the same time advance our right and assail his front, so as to roll up and press back his entire left wing towards Fredericksburg. Instructions were also given that the left brigades conform their movements to those of the troops on their right, holding back, however, so as to constitute a sort of movable pivot upon which the whole line might wheel. It is evident that the successful execution of such a movement would not only have disposed of Hancock for the day, but would have thrown a powerful force perpendicular to General Grant's centre and right wing, already confronted by General Ewell. There is a lull a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
Rappahannock, and that of General Lee reoccupied its old grounds opposite Hooker, on the Richmond side, in and around Fredericksburg. As it was evident that the Federal army could not be attacked as it stood, except under great disadvantages, it wwar into the enemy's country. Accordingly, on the 3d of June, 1863, my division moved from its camps in and around Fredericksburg, and took position at Culpeper Courthouse. Hood's division followed mine and then came Ewell's corps — Hill's corps my was at this time very much scattered, his advance being over one hundred miles or more from Hill's corps, still at Fredericksburg. But General Hooker, who must have been aware of this, did not attempt to take advantage of the situation. When Hooker withdrew from Hill's front at Fredericksburg that officer moved with his corps, following the rear of General Lee's army, and, passing Longstreet, advanced into Maryland; while Longstreet, marching more leisurely, moved to the east of the mount
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding and death of General J. E. B. Stuart-several errors corrected. (search)
ter, only seven months old, to whom he had given the name Virginia, named for the State in whose defence he yielded up his life. The child he lost was a daughter, Flora. She died November 3, 1862, when the Confederate cavalry were for fourteen consecutive days fighting untiringly, holding in check the whole of Pleasanton's cavalry, supported heavily by infantry, who were covering McClellan s march across to Fauquier, when McClellan was superseded by Burnside, before the army moved to Fredericksburg. The loss of this dearly loved child was a great blow to him, greatly increased by his utter inability to be with her; but in his letters be expressed the most beautiful Christian resignation and his perfect willingness to meet the same great change whenever his Maker should call. The world knows little of the circumstances which led to and immediately followed the wounding of General J. E. B. Stuart, at Yellow Tavern, in May, 1864. Some have pretended to tell what they saw ; bu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. (search)
Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. headquarters Johnson's division, August 18th, 1863. Major A. S. Pendleton, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — In obedience to orders, headquarters Second army corps, August 13, 1863, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from the time of leaving Fredericksburg for Winchester until it crossed the Potomac. The division left camp near Hamilton's crossing June 5th, 1863, and moved in the direction of Winchester, crossing the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap. Nothing occurred worthy of particular note during the march, which was steady and regular, the command being in good condition and excellent spirits. At daylight of the morning of the 13th ultimo, the division left its camp at Cedarville, moving on the Winchester and Front Royal turnpike. The enemy's pickets were discovered four miles from the town about 12 M. The Second Virginia regiment, Colonel Nadenbousch commanding, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
. Kilpatrick, J. J. Cumpsten, John A. Russell, and John Charles. The Virginia division A. N. V. Association have happily selected as their orator at their annual reunion in October next, General Fitz. Lee. He has chosen as his subject Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and we can promise in advance, something which shall be at the same time entertaining to those who may hear it, and of great value to the historian. This Association have been very fortunate in the orators who have repree entertaining to those who may hear it, and of great value to the historian. This Association have been very fortunate in the orators who have represented them at previous reunions, and the series of addresses embraced in the A. N. V. Memorial Volume (see advertisement) will compare favorably with any historical addresses ever delivered. But the value of the series will be greatly enhanced when the gallant Fitz. Lee shall have added the true story of Fredericksburg and of Chancellorsville.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
. Gregory. The list of Federal contributions is as follows: Characteristics of the army, by H. V. Redfield; Death of General John H. Morgan, by H. V. Redfield; General Meade at Gettysburg, by Colonel James C. Biddle; General Reynolds' last battle, by Major Joseph G. Rosengarten; Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg, by Major J. E. Carpenter; How Jefferson Davis was overtaken, by Major-General Wilson; Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid, by Colonel J. E. McGowan; On the Field of Fredericksburg, by Hon. D. Watson Rowe; Recollections of General Reynolds, by General T. F. McCoy; Some recollections of Grant, by S. H. M. Byers; The Baltimore Riots, by Frederic Emory; The battle of Beverly ford, by Colonel F. C. Newhall; The battle of Shiloh, by Colonel Wills De Hass; The campaign of Gettysburg, by Major-General Alfred Pleasonton; The capture of Mason and Slidell, by R. M. Hunter; The draft Riots in New York, by Major T. P. McElrath; The famous fight at Cedar creek
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence concerning the campaign of 1864. (search)
he enemy near Wright's tavern, two and one half miles from Milford, where they showed themselves in some force. I think about five regiments were seen. At the Poorhouse I drove them back, but they are still on this side of the river. I shall occupy the road from Milford to the Junction tonight, and will advise you of any movement. General------is near Panola, his left resting on this road. Scouts just in say that only six of Sheridan's men crossed the Pamunkey, and that they went to Fredericksburg. The raiding party who burned Hanover Courthouse went down towards Charles City. This party between here and Milford could be cut off, unless they are much larger than I suppose. I am sure that I could burn the bridge behind them, and an attack in front would destroy them. Could you send any more troops up to effect this? I know this county thoroughly, and I think that a good blow might be struck. I shall be here to-night. If any of the cavalry come to the Junction, let them know
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Farmington, Tennessee--report of General Daniel Ruggles. (search)
ed the Federal forces — comprising his corps — engaged in this battle, and that he had sent a telegram from the field to Mr. Lincoln, the Federal Executive, that he had in this engagement taken 20,000 Rebel prisoners. Our forces captured a considerable amount of camp equipage, arms and equipments while driving the enemy from the field. At the close of the action General Bragg said, as we met on the field, addressing me, General, the honors of the field are yours. Daniel Ruggles. Fredericksburg, Va., May 26, 1879. Brigadier-General J. P. Anderson speaks in terms of special commendation of the conduct of the First brigade, specifying the Confederate Guards of Louisiana and the Florida battalion, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Clack; the Twenty-eighth regiment. Louisiana volunteers, Colonel Fisk, and also of the Thirty-seventh Mississippi volunteers, during a brief period when under his observation. The Second brigade, Major D. Gober commanding, participated to a small exte
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