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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the campaign of 1864 in Virginia. (search)
brigades, and sometimes regiments, as their formation was completed in succession, assailed the foe with almost resistless fury. And now, within less than two hours from the time that the head of their column had reached the field, two small divisions, numbering in all nine thousand men, had met and rolled back in confusion eight full divisions of the enemy, constituting one-half of General Grant's vast army! His own corps of four divisions, two divisions of Burnside's corps, and two of Warren's I do not think a parallel can be found in the history of modern warfare. It was now nearly nine o'clock in the morning. The great struggle was still to come. The Federal lines were some distance in front of the Brock road, the most direct route to Spotsylvania Courthouse and to Richmond. They had even taken the precaution to construct upon it a triple line of fortifications. Situated as the armies were, it was the obvious policy of each commander to double back the wing of the oppos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen heroes: an address delivered by Hon. A. M. Keiley, of Richmond, on Memorial day, at Loudon park, near Baltimore, June 5, 1879. (search)
Clinton passionately denounced the patriotic women of New York. At the base of every statue which gratitude has erected to patriotism in America, you will find rebel written. The springing shaft at Bunker Hill, the modest slab which tells where Warren fell, the monument which has given your fair city its proudest title, the fortresses which line our coast, the name of our country capital, the very streets of our cities — all proclaim America's boundless debt to Rebels--not only to rebels who, like Hamilton and Warren, gave their first love and service to the young republic;: but rebels who, like Franklin and Washington, broke their oath of allegiance to become rebels. It was a rebellion that gave England her Great Charter, habeas corpus, her constitutional form, her parlimentary government. It was a rebellion which, after a hundred years of fierce unrest, has blossomed in our own day upon the soil of France into a republic, which every well-wisher of liberty must pray may be perp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
ch is, however, afterwards occupied by us, the enemy being driven out. Kershaw's and Humphreys' brigades are turned off rapidly to the left of the road, and, occupying some cover left by our cavalry, repulse the enemy with great slaughter. Wofford's and Bryan's brigades are sent against the Courthouse by a detour, and finally occupy it. During the fight with the two first named brigades, Haskell's battalion is sharply engaged and does good work. The enemy's forces comprise the Fifth corps (Warren's). Ewell's corps arrives in the afternoon, and the enemy makes another attack on our position with their Sixth corps, which is also repulsed, Rodes' division being thrown on Kershaw's right and relieving the attack. Commanding-General arrives with Ewell. May 9th Quiet in morning. Troops in line all day. Trenches dug. An attack by us is proposed, which is, however, deferred in expectation of one from the enemy. In the afternoon an attack by General Johnson is projected, to be assist
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
ays that staff officers could see to write their dispatches by moonlight. Gibbon, near Falmouth, was also ordered to cross the river on the night of the 2d. Sedgwick, Hooker tells us, did not obey the spirit of the order, and delayed too long. Warren told him that if he (Warren) had not been there, Sedgwick would not have moved at all. At 11 P. M. Sedgwick received this order to cross (Sedgwick's report). Being already over, he began to move by the flank up the Bowling Green road towards FredWarren) had not been there, Sedgwick would not have moved at all. At 11 P. M. Sedgwick received this order to cross (Sedgwick's report). Being already over, he began to move by the flank up the Bowling Green road towards Fredericksburg, leaving one division in front of Early's right. About daylight he occupied the town. Gibbon crossed early on the 3d, and at 7 A. M. was formed on Sedgwick's right. In moving forward to turn our left he was stopped by the canal. Sedgwick then determined to assault Marye's and the contiguous hills, and did so. His right column under Colonel Spear, consisted of four regiments; his left of two regiments under Colonel Johns. Both columns, supported by four other regiments under Colon