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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. Our Papers for 1880 will not only not show any diminution of interest, but we pledge ourselves to make them more readable and more valuable than ever before. On the one hand, we shall not lose sight of the fact that we are preparing material for the future historian, which shall vindicate the name and fame of the heroic men who made our great struggle for constitutional freedom; but on the other hand, we shall see to it that each number is of popular interest, somy of Northern Virginia Memorial volume has been delayed by causes over which the compiler has had no control; but the printing is now all done, and it will be ready for delivery just as soon as it can be gotten from the binders — in a few days, we hope. Meantime, be sure to send on your subscription. Ask your neighbor if he has renewed his subscription for 1880, and remind him that the terms are strictly $3 per annum in advance; and be sure that you send us at least one new subscriber.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. The army of Virginia, from Cedar mountain to Alexandria, 1862. By Brevet Major-General George H. Gordon, U. S. Volunteers. Boston: Houghton, Osgood & Co. 1880. We are indebted to the publishers for a copy of this beautiful specimen of the book-maker's art, which in paper, type and binding is what we may expect from the famous Riverside press. We have read every page of the book with deep interest, and (reserving for the future a full review) we do not hesitate to say that it is in the main an able, candid, remarkably fair, and very valuable contribution to the history of the campaign of which it treats. General Gordon has diligently studied both the Federal and the Cenfederate official reports, and all other means of information accessible to him; has made skillful use of his material, and has produced, in many respects, a model book. His tribute to Stonewall Jackson, who was his classmate at West Point, is very beautiful. His acknowledgment of the a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. Renewals are still in order, and we are very anxious to hear from a number of subscribers who have not yet sent their $3 for 1880. Please ask your neighbor if he has done so. And we again beg our friends to exert themselves to secure us new subscribers, to recommend to us suitable agents, to whom we can pay liberal commissions, to canvass for our Papers, and to secure the sale of our back volumes to public libraries or private individuals. We have on hand about $4,500 worth of back numbers, which we are anxious to dispose of, and the sale of which would greatly help our treasury just now. old debt is never a pleasant subject of discourse, and we sincerely wish that our friends would take from us all opportunity of ever speaking again of ours. We repeat that our future is assured, if we can only rid ourselves of the debt that has lapped over from ‘76-77. Some of our friends have responded liberally, others have promised to help, and we beg to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
es, who served in the army and Navy of the United States during the rebellion. There were in the service in all capacities during the war two hundred and sixty-six of the old students, and of these twenty-one were killed or died from wounds or disease contracted in the service. We have said that the book is admirably gotten up (albeit there are, of course, sentiments which we utterly repudiate, and phrases which we would fain hope our friend Major Burrage would modify if he had written in 1880 instead of 1868), and we would rejoice to see such a volume for every college and university in the land. We were very much struck by one statement, as illustrating the odds against which the South fought: Brown University not only continued its regular sessions but, had in attendance more than its average of students during the whole war. This was probably true of other Northern colleges; while nearly every college at the South was closed, and its professors and students enlisted en masse