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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles Carter Lee or search for Charles Carter Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
e, the enemy's force rapidly accumulated as they fell back, and finding that the enemy extended much beyond my right flank, no further advance was attempted. At dark I placed my brigade in bivouac on the edge of the battlefield, and having reported to Major-General Hill through a member of my staff, was ordered to remain there until daylight, and then return to the point from which I had started into battle on the previous afternoon. In this engagement, I had the misfortune to lose Colonel Charles C. Lee, of the Thirty-seventh regiment. A thoroughly educated soldier and an exemplary gentleman, whose life had been devoted to the profession of arms, the service lost in him one of its most promising officers. During the afternoon of Thursday I received marching orders, and after proceeding a short distance down the road on which we had previously been moving, was ordered to return to camp. I was returning, when a heavy fire of artillery and small arms on the left showed that attack
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
ringing steps pressed forward. Arriving upon open ground, he formed his line and moved to the support of the troops in his front. Finding that General Magruder needed assistance, I sent two brigades — Branch's and Thomas' (Anderson's). They were, however, not actively engaged. My division, however, was placed in line of battle near the scene of action and under fire, but passive. Among the general and field officers killed and wounded during these battles are Colonels Campbell, C. C. Lee, * * killed, and Colonels Cowan, J. H. Lane, * * wounded. Especial mention for conspicuous gallantry is made of the following officers: Colonels * * * J. H. Lane and Cowan. Extracts from General Lee's report. Pressing on towards the York River railroad, A. P. Hill, who was in advance, reached the vicinity of New Cold Harbor about 2 P. M., where he encountered the enemy. He immediately formed his line nearly parallel to the road leading from that place towards the McGehee's hous
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
pany was temporarily encamped at Saint Luther's church in Powhatan county for purposes of instruction in camp and guard duty, the sudden order was received from General Lee to report for active service in Richmond the following day. The members were immediately dispersed to their respective homes for hasty preparation. Some of thewin and Major Joe Selden, of Chapultepec fame and memory, and was ordered to march on the following day to the front; but dispatches received that night induced General Lee to change the order and to expedite the movement by taking a special train ordered for us on the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad--our point of destination being Cuier. When we left Powhatan, a fund of $2,000 was given us by the county to aid our preparations for service. We were in need of one ambulance horse; but Charles Carter Lee, a brother of our noble and loved General — not a secessionist per se--but an ardent Southern sympathizer, contributed a very fine thoroughbred animal of th