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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Charles Marshall in 1874; Major John W. Daniel in 1875; Captain W. Gordon McCabe in 1876; Leigh Robinson, Esq., in 1877; Colonel William Allan in 1878; and General Fitzhugh Lee in 1879. 3. A carefully-prepared Roster of the Army of Northern Virginia. 4. A statement of the Relative Numbers of the Army of Northern Virginia andding to binding, and will be mailed, or sent by express, to any address on receipt of the price. The five-dollar edition contains the best steel engraving of General Lee we have ever seen, and a beautiful Confederate battle-flag, and is superbly bound in fine diced Russia. Orders may be sent either to the Publishers or to then Rev. Dr. A. T. Bledsoe's able discussion of the secession question in Is Davis a Traitor? Rev. Dr. Dabney's life of Stonewall Jackson; John Esten Cooke's Life of Lee, and Military biography of Stonewall Jackson; Colonel Charles C. Jones' Siege of Savannah, Chatham artillery, Life of Commodore Tatnall, &c.; General Basil W. Duke'
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
eld into the opposite woods, strewing the narrow valley with their dead. In this charge Archer's brigade was subjected to a heavy fire. At this time the Federal cavalry charged upon Taliaferro's brigade with impetuous valor, but were met with such determined resistance by Taliaferro's brigade in its front, and by so galling a fire from Branch's brigade in flank, that it was forced rapidly from the field with loss and in disorder. * * * T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. Extract from General Lee's report. The enemy's infantry advanced about five o'clock P. M., and attacked General Early in front, while another body, concealed by the inequality of the ground, moved upon his right. Thomas' brigade of A. P. Hill's division, which had now arrived, was sent to his support, and the contest soon became animated. In the meantime the main body of the Federal infantry, under cover of a wood and the undulations of the field, gained the left of Jackson's division, now commanded by Bri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate flag. (search)
half from the union to be a red bar extending the width of the flag. Before offering the bill that gentleman addressed a letter to the Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, requesting his views in regard to the proposed alteration. General Lee replied that he thought it very pretty and that it certainly added distinctness to the flag, but with his usual modesty said he mistrusted his own judgment in such matters and that the naval gentlemen were the proper persons to be consulted. ilitary Afffairs, and I now have the honor to submit herewith for your consideration the letters I have received from General J. E. Johnston, General S. Cooper, Lieutenant-General Ewell, Lieutenant-General Longstreet's Inspector-General, Major-Generals Fitz. Lee, Rosser and Lomax, of cavalry; Brigadier-Generals Pendleton and Long, of artilery; Major-General Heth, Major-General Smith,Governor of Virginia; and Major-General Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute; Captain N. W. Ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
d so entertaining and instructive that I venture, holding fast to that lecture as a text, but invoking also my personal acquaintance with the leading actors, and my practical knowledge of the field of operations (which I have twice traversed on horseback from one end to the other), to give to my comrades-in-arms as a detailed picture of that drama of the Valley of Virginia. The little Girl who wished to die for Stonewall Jackson, because only her immediate family would weep for her, and all the world would weep for him (and for whom General Fitz. Lee, in his address before the Army of Northern Virginia Association, expressed the earnest hope that if still alive she was beloved and happy ), it will be interesting to our readers to state was Miss Lucy Chandler, but who has been for some years Mrs. Charles K. Pendleton. As the wife of a brave Confederate soldier and worthy gentleman, and the mother of several children, she has already realized the wish of the gallant cavalier.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
a times of March 13th in reply to Generals A. L. Long and Fitz. Lee will excite attention and elicit wile comment. We make h notice, for reasons which will appear. In reference to General Lee's Final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign andis true, we made a very serious blunder in publishing as General Lee's report something patched up for a purpose after his deas originally published in 1869--nearly two years before General Lee's death — by Mr. Wm. Swinton (author of the Army of the the Historical Magazine, New York. 2. In April, 1869, General Lee told General Early that he had received the published cos substantially correct. 3. Colonel Charles Marshall, General Lee's Military Secretary, stated that he had lent Mr. Swinto draft of the report from which a copy had been made for General Lee, and which was the same as that published in the Histori. is evidently a copy of the finally corrected report of General Lee, and its authenticity seems to us beyond all doubt. W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
Sharpsburg--By direction of General Jackson, I remained at. Harper's Ferry until the morning of the 17th, when, at half-past 6 A. M., I received an order from General Lee to move to Sharpsburg. Leaving Thomas with his brigade to complete the removal of the captured property, my division was put in motion at half-past 7 A. M. The head of my column arrived upon the battlefield of Sharpsburg, a distance of seventeen miles, at. half-past 2, and, reporting in person to General Lee, he directed me to take position on our right. Brigadier-General D. R. Jones, commanding on the right, gave me such information as my ignorance of the ground made necessary. My troconfidence. We lay upon the field of battle that night, and until the next night at one o'clock, when my division was silently withdrawn, and, as directed by General Lee, covered the retirement of our army. My division crossed the Potomac into Virginia about ten A. M. the next morning — every wagon and piece of artillery having
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative strength at Second Manassas. (search)
on's and Evans' brigades4,600   Total infantry taken by General Lee26,768 The cavalry, under General Stuart, consisted of two brigades under Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee. Hampton was left at Richmond, and Fitzhugh Lee's brigade, consisting of the First, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Ninth Virginia cavalry, accompanied the army on thFitzhugh Lee's brigade, consisting of the First, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Ninth Virginia cavalry, accompanied the army on the Manassas campaign. The total of Stuart's force July 20th was 4,035, of which Colonel Taylor estimates that Fitzhugh Lee had 2,500. This estimate is no doubt nearly correct. The artillery taken consisted of twenty batteries (and possibly a few more). There were the four companies constituting the Washington artillery, viz: SFitzhugh Lee had 2,500. This estimate is no doubt nearly correct. The artillery taken consisted of twenty batteries (and possibly a few more). There were the four companies constituting the Washington artillery, viz: Squiers', Richardson's, Miller's and Eshleman's; the five under Colonel S. D. Lee, viz: Eubank's, Parker's, Rhett's, Jordan's and Taylor's; three attached to Hood's division, viz: Reilly's, Bachman's and Garden's, and the following: Dixie artillery, Striblings', Maurin's, Leake's, Rodger's, Brown's, Grimes' and Anderson's batteries
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
y birth), he distinguished himself in the engineer service, and was afterwards put in charge of the Nitre and Mining Bureau, which he managed with an energy, skill and real ability which produced results almost miraculous in the face of the difficulties against which he had to contend. In the early part of February, 1865, he was made Commissary-General of the Confederacy, and discharged his duties with such ability that, in spite of the constantly decreasing resources of the Confederacy, General Lee wrote three weeks afterwards that his army had not been so well supplied for many months. He also received the warmest commendation both from President Davis and the then Secretary of War--General John C. Breckinridge. The details of his service as Commissary-General were given in the modest but able paper from his facile pen which, with the accompanying documents, we published in our number for March, 1877 (volume V, pages 97-111). We deeply regret that his death will deprive us of a p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
e bank of the river, we continued to hold that day, although exposed to the enemy's guns and within range of his sharpshooters, posted near the Chesapeake and Ohio canal. Our infantry remained at the river until relieved by cavalry, under General Fitzhugh Lee. * * * We remained near Martinsburg until the 27th, when we moved to Bunker hill, in the county of Berkeley. T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. Extracts from General Lee's reports. Warrenton Springs--General Jackson's command lGeneral Lee's reports. Warrenton Springs--General Jackson's command lay between that place (Jeffersonton) and the Springs ford, and a warm cannonade was progressing between the batteries of General A. P. Hill's division and those of the enemy. Battle of Manassas--While this demonstration was being made on the right, a large force advanced to assail the left of Jackson's position, occupied by the division of A. P. Hill. The attack was received by his troops with their accustomed steadiness, and the battle raged with great fury. The enemy was repeatedly repul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of General J. E. B. Stuart before Chancellorsville. (search)
d. Here we halted, dismounted in the woods, and reclining against trees or in fence corners, slept in a drenching rain for nearly two hours. Neither we nor our horses had eaten anything since the morning before. At 3 A. M. a dispatch from General Fitz. Lee directed us to move forward, get in front of and delay the enemy, and give all attainable information to General R. E. Lee. We struck the Germanna road near Wilderness tavern, turned up towards Germanna ford, and sent forward another scoutwards their support. Skirmishers were then thrown out on both sides, and a sharp fusilade kept up for some time. Our scouts from Ely's ford coming in about 8 o'clock, I was ordered to select a well mounted trooper, and send a dispatch to General Fitzhugh Lee of what we had learned as to the force at Germanna ford, and also that a heavy wagon train and artillery train were across at Ely's, and, under escort of a large force of infantry, moving towards Chancellorsville. We had sent couriers tow