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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 56 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 34 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. Sooy Smith or search for W. Sooy Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 51 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. (search)
Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. headquarters Forrest's cavalry Department, Columbus, Miss., March 8th, 1864. Colonel — I have the honor to submit the following report of the movements and operations of my command against the Federal forces under command of General Smith, in the engagements of the 20th, 21st and 22d ultimo. Learning on the 14th ultimo at Oxford that the enemy was moving in heavy force in the direction of Pontotoc, anGeneral Smith, in the engagements of the 20th, 21st and 22d ultimo. Learning on the 14th ultimo at Oxford that the enemy was moving in heavy force in the direction of Pontotoc, and believing his destination to be the prairies, and from thence a junction with Sherman, I withdrew all my forces from the Tallahatchie and Yazoo rivers and moved rapidly to Starkville, which place I reached on the evening of the 18th ultimo. On the 19th the enemy were reported at Okalona, but his movements or intended course was not developed; and fearing he might cross the Tombigbee, I ordered Bell's brigade to Columbus, and also dispatched General Ruggles to use all his effective force to p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's Meridian expedition and Sooy Smith's raid to West point. (search)
y of twenty-six thousand men, supported by W. Sooy Smith's cavalry raid from Collierville, Tennessend cavalry under his command, including General W. S. Smith's in West Tennessee--amounting in all tngagement till his arrival. The Federal General Smith left Collierville, on the Mobile and Ohio arrival. Jeff. Forrest commmenced fighting Smith with his brigade on the 18th February, towards at once comprehended a change of programme in Smith's plans, and commenced one of his headlong pursuits, following Smith to vicinity of Pontotoc. Considerable skirmishing took place in the pursuit of the stream to be used in the advance. General Smith soon arrived, and placed the whole commandrters were brought in. These were taken to General Smith, who questioned them. He (General Smith) force, including infantry and artillery. He (Smith) immediately reassumed the direction of affairrsation herein related between himself and General Smith. In the official report of General S. D[18 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg--report of General Junius Daniel. (search)
he fresh columns that came down to the relief of those that had been broken and were leaving their works, until ordered by General Johnson to fall back with the rest of his line about three-quarters of a miles and occupy the position along a run at the foot of the hill. I remained in this position, with my skirmishers warmly engaged, and the enemy's fire reaching and doing some execution upon our line, from about three o'clock P. M. until nearly 12 M., when I received orders to follow General Smith's brigade with my own and Rodes' brigade back to the town, and there report to General Rodes. Having done this, my brigade was assigned a position on the left of the division; this I reached and occupied about daybreak on the morning of the 4th. I cannot, in justice to the officers and men of my command, close this portion of my report without recording my earnest conviction that the conduct of none of the troops who participated in this engagement will furnish brighter examples of p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate flag. (search)
J. E. Johnston, General S. Cooper, Lieutenant-General Ewell, Lieutenant-General Longstreet's Inspector-General, Major-Generals Fitz. Lee, Rosser and Lomax, of cavalry; Brigadier-Generals Pendleton and Long, of artilery; Major-General Heth, Major-General Smith,Governor of Virginia; and Major-General Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute; Captain N. W. Barker, Acting Chief of Signal Bureau, and Captain Wilbourn, of Signal corps; Brigadier-General Wharton, Colonel J. S. Mosby, aMajor-General Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute; Captain N. W. Barker, Acting Chief of Signal Bureau, and Captain Wilbourn, of Signal corps; Brigadier-General Wharton, Colonel J. S. Mosby, and many other distinguished officers of the army, all approving this design, which, with such letters as have been addressed to you on the subject, will furnish your committee with the desired information. Allow me, General, to add a few words on the merits of the proposed alteration. Under the present act of Congress the proportions of the flag are incorrect, the length being double the width, which is against all rule, and a flag so made will not float. The one now used over the capitol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations about Lookout mountain. (search)
eral Jackson), that known as the Craven house slope, extending from the left of Walker's line to Smith's trail, on the western side of the mountain; and the defence of the top of the mountain was entt, from which position they could pour upon the enemy a most destructive fire, and by descending Smith's trail with troops from above, to strike him in flank. Accordingly, after seeing General Mooreched General Jackson, I suppose, a little after eleven (11) o'clock A. M. I caused the picket at Smith's trail to be largely increased, and a strong force to be posted as sharpshooters along the cresnd thence making nearly a right angle across the northwest slope of the mountain to a point near Smith's trail. The enemy, as Walthall mentions in his report, had threatened to force a passage of thn the fog rose, attack the enemy in flank by sharpshooters on the mountain crest, and descending Smith's trail take him in rear, and, I doubted not, drive him from the slope. This statement I repeat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg and the charge of the Twenty-fourth Virginia of Early's brigade. (search)
up the York to West Point in the vain hope of getting in our rear. Our orders were that Magruder should not halt at all and that the other divisions should take up their march to the Chickahominy at early dawn — Longstreet being in the rear. So Smith moved on at day, then the trains followed, and Hill's infantry were filing into the road when orders came to halt and then to return to town. The enemy's van had come up and was disposed to skirmish with the rear guard--fresh troops were arrivt they should have immortal written upon their banner forever; and.although he had, as already said, five regiments of infantry and ten guns--4,000 men — he called loudly and frequently for reinforcements, which, to. the extent of three brigades (Smith's two and Naglee's), General McClellan sent him immediately after his arrival from the rear. It is noteworthy, that although McClellan's army was in pursuit of a retiring foe, he himself, instead of being in the van. remained below Yorktown, n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
s profession, and Dr. Ran. Barksdale, Surgeon of my squadron, now in charge of the insane hospital, and dear Dr. Maury, Assistant Surgeon, now relieved of Cullen's and Barksdale's affection and gone to his rest — the magnificent band under Leader Smith, then Grey Latham, bad luck to him, and Wheat, of the Tigers, we knew and appreciated them — braver, more tender-hearted men never lived. Walton, of the Washington artillery; Cabell, our Quartermaster and consistent and valuable friend; Colonel elancholy procession wended its way from camp to the railroad depot, with our good comrades of the Black horse and a detachment kindly sent by Colonel P. T. Moore from the First Virginia regiment, marching with reversed arms to the grand dirge by Smith's celebrated band, we escorted to the train, to be returned to his home (left by him but a few days before in health and vigor), the corpse of a young comrade, the younger son of his mother and she a widow. As we passed the headquarters, General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
nes, and of Major Russel, paymaster in the same corps, who, side by side led the assault. He says: I was deputed by Colonel Lee to read to the leader, then called Smith, a demand to surrender immediately; and I was instructed to leave the door after his refusal, which was anticipated, and wave my cap; at which signal the storming vance, batter open the doors, and capture the insurgents at the point of the bayonet. I approached the door in the presence of two thousand spectators, and told Mr. Smith that I had a communication for him from Colonel Lee. He opened the door about four inches and placed his body against the crack, with a cocked carbine in his hams but those he had offered; and as soon as I could tear myself away from their importunities I left, waved my cap, and Col. Lee's plan was carried out. * * * When Smith first came to the door I recognized old Osawatomie Brown, who had given us so much trouble in Kansas. No one then present but myself could have performed this ser
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cleburne and his division at Missionary ridge and Ringgold gap. (search)
ishing ceased at nightfall, the alignment was rectified, and such defenses were begun as the limited means at hand permitted. Cleburne's line, with his left resting near the right of the tunnel, extended over a circular wooded hill occupied by Smith's (Texas), Liddell's (Arkansas), and Polk's (Tennessee) brigades. The right flank was protected by Lowry's (Mississippi and Alabama) brigade, thrown some half a mile distant and somewhat in advance of the remainder of the division. Immediately Col. Peter Snyder, and the 2d, 15th, and 24th Arkansas, consolidated, under Col. E. Warfield. From the brigade skirmishers were thrown forward into a patch of woods in front of the gap. Connecting with Govan's right were posted two regiments of Smith's Texas brigade, Col. H. B. Granbury commanding; the 6th, 10th, and 15th Texas, consolidated, under Captain John R. Rennard on the left; and the 17th, 18th, 24th, and 25th Texas, consolidated, under Major W. A. Taylor, on the right. The other re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
to move the Seventh and Thirty-seventh to a corresponding position before ordering the whole line forward, when Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, of a Pennsylvania regiment entered our lines with a white flag and wished to know if we were Confederate or Unient which had thrown down their arms and surrendered themselves prisoners of war. This regiment was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, who had commenced to remonstrate with me for allowing it to be captured while he was in my lines with a white fonce sent the regiment to the rear under Captain Young--his company having been detailed as a guard — and turned Lieutenant-Colonel Smith over to Captain Adams, signal officer, to be taken to General A. P. Hill. General A. P. Hill being wounded, tright ahead Lane, and then rode forward. On reaching the right of my command to put it in motion, I found that a Lieutenant-Colonel Smith of the One Hundredth and Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania regiment, had come up between our line of battle and skirmi