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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Explosive or poisoned musket or rifle balls — were they authorized and used by the Confederate States army, or by the United States army during the Civil War?--a slander refuted. (search)
s — were they authorized and used by the Confederate States army, or by the United States army durin I. I most emphatically deny that the Confederate States ever authorized the use of explosive or II. I most emphatically assert that the United States did purchase, authorize, issue and use exphose valuable quarto volumes issued by the United States Medical Department and entitled The Medicaly 11th, 1879, that to his knowledge the Confederate States never authorized or used explosive or pohe third place, a brief examination of the United States Patent Office Reports for 1862-3, and the pon the Confederates, were patented by the United States Patent Office at Washington, and were purccircular the then Chief of Ordnance of the United States, General A. B. Dyer, made the following re23, 1862. In the Patent Office Report (United States) for 1863-4 will be found a shell exactly rs. Does Mr. Lossing purposely forget the United States drafts made to fill up the depleted regime[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two specimen cases of desertion. (search)
nd our camp, I left my bivouac-fire to attend the session of the court. Winding for miles along uncertain paths, I at length arrived at the court-ground at Round Oak church. Day after day it had been our duty to try the gallant soldiers of that army charged with violations of military law; but never had I on any previous occasion been greeted by such anxious spectators as on that morning awaited the opening of the court. Case after case was disposed of, and at length the case of The Confederate States vs. Edward Cooper was called — charge, desertion. A low murmur rose spontaneously from the battle-scarred spectators as a young artilleryman rose from the prisoners' bench, and, in response to the question, Guilty or not guilty? answered, Not guilty. The Judge-Advocate was proceeding to open the prosecution, when the court, observing that the prisoner was unattended by counsel, interposed and inquired of the accused, Who is your counsel? He replied, I have no counsel. Supposing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's Meridian expedition and Sooy Smith's raid to West point. (search)
the Confederacy was cut in two by the capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, including the Confederate States armies used in keeping closed the Mississippi river. This great river — and even most of nd not including the immense gunboat fleet on the river itself. Pemberton's and Gardner's Confederate States armies having been captured, there remained in observation of this large force in Mississippi two small divisions of Confederate States infantry, Loring at Canton, and French at Morton — about nine thousand men. S. D. Lee, with four brigades of cavalry — Stark and Ross of Jackson's divisiohandsomely done, as the large force of the enemy was visible to almost every member of the Confederate States command. An incident near the old battlefield of Baker's creek is worthy of being recorrrest. So what was the military gain by his expedition? He utterly failed to paralyze the Confederate States forces, the infantry moving to counteract the movement of Federal troops for the Georgia c<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
n fine diced Russia. Orders may be sent either to the Publishers or to the Compiler Box 61, Richmond, Va. Scribner's monthly for January has been received and is a rich number, beautifully illustrated and full of good things. The United States Life Saving Service, Success with Small Fruits. Young Artists' Life in New York, The Acadians in Louisiana, A Revolutionary Congressman on Horseback, American Arms and Ammunition, A Personal and what came of it, Topics of the Time, Home andnes' Siege of Savannah, Chatham artillery, Life of Commodore Tatnall, &c.; General Basil W. Duke's History of Morgan's cavalry ; General Jordan's Forrest and his campaigns, Admiral Semmes' Service Afloat; Boykin's Life of Howell Cobb; Handy's United States Bonds; Stevenson's Southern side of Andersonville; Brevier's First and Second Confederate Missouri brigades; Hodge's First Kentucky brigade; Wilkinson's Blockade Runner; Alfriend's Life of Jefferson Davis; Miss Emily Mason's Popular life of G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
ew Orleans: Published by General G. T. Beauregard, for the benefit of the Hood Orphan Memorial Fund. We have just received this book, and must reserve a notice for our next number. But we may say now that these personal experiences in the United States and Confederate States armies, by the chivalric and lamentened Hood, cannot but be of deep interest; that his side of the story, however men may differ in reference to certain unfortunate controversies of which it treats, will be valuable matConfederate States armies, by the chivalric and lamentened Hood, cannot but be of deep interest; that his side of the story, however men may differ in reference to certain unfortunate controversies of which it treats, will be valuable material for the future historian; and that as the proceeds of the sale go to the relief of his helpless orphans, the book ought to have a wide sale in every section of the country, and ought especially to find a place in the homes of all dwellers in the land he loved so well. Father Ryan's poems, in a beautiful volume, embelished with superb steel engravings of the author and of The conquered banner, has just come to us from Randolph & English, Richmond. The bare announcement is sufficient
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate flag. (search)
but the union is the same with that of the United States flag, and the bars are only wider stripes s corresponding in number to that of the Confederate States. In reference to the last flag adopt The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact, That the flag of the Confederate StConfederate States shall be as follows: The width two-thirds of its length, with the union (now used as the battle, corresponding in number to that of the Confederate States; the field to be white, except the outeris deemed especially appropriate for the Confederate States--the white (argent) being emblematic of by Captain Hamilton, in the history of the United States flag, that they generally imitate the ensiker, the latter being at the head of the Confederate States Naval Academy. Your committee has been ry's flag, The basis of the flag of the United States was the great Union flag displayed by Genebirth to the permanent Government of the Confederate States. I am, General, most respectfully, yo[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Richard Kirkland, the humane hero of Fredericksburg. (search)
ivate Captain J. D. Kennedy's company (E) of the Second South Carolina volunteers, in which company he was a sergeant in December, 1862. The day after the sanguinary battle of Fredericksburg, Kershaw's brigade occupied the road at the foot of Marye's hill and the ground about Marye's house, the scene of their desperate defence of the day before. One hundred and fifty yards in front of the road, the stone facing of which constituted the famous stone wall, lay Syke's division of regulars, U. S. A., between whom and our troops a murderous skirmish occupied the whole day, fatal to many who heedlessly exposed themselves, even for a moment. The ground between the lines was bridged with the wounded, dead and dying Federals, victims of the many desperate and gallant assaults of that column of 30,000 brave men hurled vainly against that impregnable position. All that day those wounded men rent the air with their groans and their agonizing cries of Water! Water! In the afternoon the Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The burning of Columbia, South Carolina-report of the Committee of citizens appointed to collect testimony. (search)
by fire. If a single town or village or hamlet within their line of march escaped altogether the torch of the invaders, the committee have not been informed of the exception. The line of General Sherman's march, from his entering the territory of the State up to Columbia, and from Columbia to the North Carolina border, was one continuous track of fire. The devastation and ruin thus inflicted were but the execution of the policy and plan of General Sherman for the subjugation of the Confederate States. Extracts from his address at Salem, Illinois, have appeared in the public prints and thus he announces and vindicates the policy and plan referred to: We were strung out from Nashville clear down to Atlanta. Had I then gone on, stringing out our forces, what danger would there not have been of their attacking the little head of the column and crushing it? Therefore, I resolved in a moment to stop the game of guarding their cities, and to destroy their cities. We were determined to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
l to those left behind to see to it that the material for a true history of our great struggle is put into proper shape. The Maryland shaft for the soldiers' cemetery at Winchester has been completed, and will be unveiled in Winchester on the 5th of June--the Confederate memorial day of Stonewall cemetery. Our friend, Captain Winfield Peters, of Baltimore, favored us with a visit a few days ago, and imparted to us some of his own enthusiasm as he spoke of the ease with which the Confederate States Army and Navy Society of Baltimore had raised $2,200 for this shaft, and their plans for a grand occasion at the unveiling on the approaching memorial day at Winchester. He also spoke enthusiastically and hopefully of the purpose of a number of their admirers to rear a monument at Winchester to the Ashby brothers (Turner and Richard), who surely deserve such commemoration. The South Carolina monument Association of Columbia, South Carolina, published last year ( edited by the Ro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
s gotten up the pamphlet, with a steel portrait of De Soto as frontispiece, in a manner every way creditable to the enterprise and skill of all concerned. Scribner's monthly for April fully sustains the reputation of this superbly illustrated and widely popular magazine. This number completes volume XIX of the monthly, and a glance at the index for the volume shows that in variety of topics, beauty of illustrations, literary finish and practical value, Scribner deserves the wide reputation it has won — a reputation which has swelled its leaders to hundreds of thousands in America, and which has given it already over ten thousand subscribers in England. St. Nicholas--the queen of Magazines for children — seems to increase in interest from month to month, and if we are to judge by the sparkling eyes and warm expressions of delight with which our little folks greeted the April number, that is fully up to the high standard the Scribners have fixed for their childrens' month
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