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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 740 208 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 428 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 383 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 366 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 335 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 260 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 250 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 236 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 220 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
orders, it was stated that General Jackson would cross the railroad at three o'clock Thursday morning, and allowing one hour for the transmission of the message, I was under arms and prepared to cross at 4 o'clock A. M. on Thursday. Not having received any intelligence from General Jackson, and General Lee's orders to me being explicit, there was no danger of my mistaking a false movement; but, after eight o'clock in the morning, I received from you a written order in these words: Wait for Jackson's notification before you move, unless I send further orders. Up to this time my brigade was in the open fields near the banks of the stream, and in full view of the enemy's pickets on the other side. To deceive them as to my purpose, I now marched it back half a mile in the direction of my camp at Brooke church and masked it in the woods. At a few minutes before 10 o'clock A. M., I received from General Jackson a note informing me that the head of his column was, at the moment of his wr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's Meridian expedition and Sooy Smith's raid to West point. (search)
mall force of cavalry, crossed such streams as the Big Black and Pearl rivers, and passed through the centre of Mississippi, in the face of twds Canton, to enable General Loring's infantry division to cross Pearl river from Canton, moving towards Morton on the Jackson and Meridian rhe road from Clinton towards Madison station, on the railroad from Jackson to Canton, to more completely cover Loring's march. A regiment wa front of the enemy, in case he moved towards Brandon and across Pearl river. As soon as it was ascertained that Sherman was crossing at JJackson, Adams, Starke and Ferguson were crossed over Pearl river — Ferguson placing himself in front of the enemy, and Jackson, with his two Pearl river — Ferguson placing himself in front of the enemy, and Jackson, with his two brigades, moving on his flank at Brandon and Pelahatchie stations. At the same time, Ross was ordered to abandon the Yazoo country and join s true General Sherman crossed such streams as the Blg Black and Pearl rivers, and passed through the centre of Mississippi to Meridian, about
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
of A. P. Hill's division, which had now arrived, was sent to his support, and the contest soon became animated. In the meantime the main body of the Federal infantry, under cover of a wood and the undulations of the field, gained the left of Jackson's division, now commanded by Brigadier-General. Taliaferro, and poured a destructive fire into his flank and rear. Campbell's brigade fell back in confusion, exposing the flank of Taliaferro's, which also gave way, as did the left of Early's. The rest of his brigade, however, firmly held its ground. Winder's brigade, with Branch's of A. P. Hill's division on its right, advanced promptly to the support of Jackson's division, and after a sanguinary struggle the enemy was repulsed with loss. Pender's and Archer's brigades, also of Hill's division, came up on the left of Winder's, and by a general charge the enemy was driven back in confusion, leaving the ground covered with his dead and wounded. * * * Night had now set in, but Gene
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate flag. (search)
duct at the second battle of Manassas, and was attached to the staff of Stonewall Jackson when he fell at Chancellorsville. Cooke, in his life of Jackson, in referring to it, says: By this fire General Hill, General Pender, Colonel Crutchfield, Jackson's Chief of Artillery, and Major Rogers, of artillery, also of Jackson's staff, were wounded, and one of the men of the ambulance corps, carrying the litter of the wounded General, was shot through both arms and dropped his burden. . . . The littJackson's staff, were wounded, and one of the men of the ambulance corps, carrying the litter of the wounded General, was shot through both arms and dropped his burden. . . . The litter-bearers made their way to a point on the road where a solitary ambulance was standing. In this ambulance Colonel Crutchfield and Major Rogers had been placed when wounded. Although badly hurt, the latter insisted upon being taken out to make room for the General, and Jackson was laid in his place. The following letters from General Lee and General Jackson's Adjutant-General bear testimony to the gallantry of this officer: headquarters army of Northern Virginia, near Fredericksbur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) (search)
t have taken place between the latter part of July and August 9th, due to the heat and sickness of the season. In the ten days preceding the battle, Banks' Federal corps seems to have lost twenty-five per cent. of its strength from this cause. Jackson's strength was lessened, but not to the same degree. Jackson's losses in the battle itself were 1,314. There seems to be an unnecessary tangle about the strength of Pope's army at the time of Cedar Run, August 9. General Pope reports offiJackson's losses in the battle itself were 1,314. There seems to be an unnecessary tangle about the strength of Pope's army at the time of Cedar Run, August 9. General Pope reports officially as follows:  Infantry.Artillery.Cavalry.Total. First corps (Seigel's)10,5509481,73013,228 Second corps (Banks')13,3431,2244,10418,671 Third corps (McDowell's)17,6049712,90421,479    41,4973,1438,73853,378 Deduct infantry brigade stationed at Winchester2,500  Deduct regiment and battery at Front Royal1,000  Deduct cavalry unfit for service3,000   6,500    Total 47.878 Note--Instead of 14,500 infantry and artillery, Banks had only about 8,000, from his report to me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
o be found of prominent military importance. The truly interesting, masterly edited organ of the association, the Southern Historical Society Papers, publishes amongst other things the hitherto unknown original reports of the Southern Generals, which are to be distinguished by a regard for truth which has not been a special characteristic of trans-Atlantic reports. Among other articles in the January number, 1879, is to be found an address which Colonel Allan (formerly Ordnance Officer of Jackson's staff), basing his views upon official documents and his personal experience, delivered before the last annual meeting of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, which I find so entertaining and instructive that I venture, holding fast to that lecture as a text, but invoking also my personal acquaintance with the leading actors, and my practical knowledge of the field of operations (which I have twice traversed on horseback from one end to the other), to give to my comrades-in-a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
f the unfinished railroad — my extreme left resting near Sudley's ford; my right near the point where the road strikes the open field; Gregg, Field and Thomas in the front line — Gregg on the left and Field on the right, with Branch, Pender and Archer as supports. My batteries were in the open field in rear of the infantry, the nature of my position being such as to preclude the effective use of much artillery. The evident intention of the enemy this day was to turn our left and overwhelm Jackson's corps before Longstreet came up, and, to accomplish this, the most persistent and furious onsets were made by column after column of infantry, accompanied by numerous batteries of artillery. Soon my reserves were all in, and up to six o'clock my division, assisted by the Louisiana brigade of General Hays, commanded by Colonel Forno, with an heroic courage and obstinacy almost beyond parallel, had met and repulsed six distinct and separate assaults — a portion of the time the majority of <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
s ford, and a warm cannonade was progressing between the batteries of General A. P. Hill's division and those of the enemy. Battle of Manassas--While this demonstration was being made on the right, a large force advanced to assail the left of Jackson's position, occupied by the division of A. P. Hill. The attack was received by his troops with their accustomed steadiness, and the battle raged with great fury. The enemy was repeatedly repulsed, but again pressed on the attack with great fury. Ox Hill--The advance of Jackson's column encountered the enemy at Ox hill, near Germantown, about 5 P. M. Line of battle was at once formed, and two brigades of A. P. Hill's division, those of Branch and Field, under Colonel Brockenbrough, were thrown forward to attack the enemy and ascertain his strength and position. A cold and drenching rain storm drove in the faces of our troops as they advanced and gallantly engaged the enemy. They were subsequently supported by the brigades of Gre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General I. R. Trimble's report of operations of his brigade from 14th to 29th of August, 1862. (search)
avalry, marched to Centreville unopposed and back to the Junction. August 28th Marched with the army to old Manassas battle-ground, and thence to near Page-land, where, at sunset, the advance columns of General Pope's army were attacked by Jackson's and Ewell's divisions--General A. P. Hill being near Sudley's mills. My brigade occupied the left wing of our attacking force--General Lawton's brigade on my right, General Jackson's division on the extreme right. General Early's brigade, osted them on his left. I selected the line of the railroad excavation and embankment, a good position, as the events of that and the next day proved, and awaited the advance of the enemy, who, largely reinforced, seemed resolved to exterminate Jackson's corps before General Longstreet should come up. Desperate fighting had begun in the woods on my left on the line of the railroad. Our skirmishers had been driven in, and every moment I expected a heavy force of the enemy to be hurled against
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Vicksburg in 1862--the battle of Baton Rouge. (search)
ts, in which a large solid shot entered a room in which two children were sleeping, and, after passing through the bureau, struck the bed, tore out the foot-posts and passed out of the house. The bed was dropped to the floor, but the children, though much frightened, were unharmed. On one occasion, soon after the investment, a regiment which had been on picket duty along the river front, on being withdrawn, was marched along the road on the bluff down to the centre of the city and out the Jackson road to its camp. The movement was in full view of the enemy, and provoked a terrific fire. At first the range was bad, but before the regiment had got out of their reach the shells burst above and around it in a manner very unpleasant. Two men were struck by pieces of shell, one being killed. No more regiments were moved by daylight along that bluff. The spectacle during the night bombardments was grand. Such displays of pyrotechnics have rarely been seen. The graceful ascent of the
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