Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Smith or search for William Smith in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the crater, July 30, 1864. (search)
s. In fifteen or twenty minutes after the explosion General Elliott came up through the crowded ditch, followed by Colonel Smith of the Twenty-sixth regiment, with a few of his men, and ordered the Twenty-sixth and Seventeenth to form a line on tr courier was sent to the division commander, and one courier to the regiments on the right of the crater. I ordered Colonel Smith to take his regiment, with three companies of the Seventeenth, under Captain Crawford (which then were larger than the officers frequently attempted to urge their men forward, and some would rush across a few yards and then run back. Colonel Smith informed me after the battle, that the enemy made a charge, and upon his men rising and pouring in a volley, they did The only mistaken movement I noticed was when one of our regiments, the Twenty-sixth South Carolina Volunteers, I think Smith's, attempted to leave the line and occupy the open ground between the crater and Elliott's headquarters. It was an effor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Kentucky campaign. (search)
al Morgan in his perilous retreat from Cumberland Gap. Again, had constant daily communications been kept up between Generals Smith and Bragg, the former after the battle of Richmond, would have been informed of the latter's position as well as that of Buell, and of such importance was this information that, in the possession of General Smith, it must have led him to advance on Louisville, which would have fallen easily into our hands, with its valuable accumulation of Federal stores, at the sn Buell so completely that the destruction of his army must have followed as an almost certain consequence. As it was, Gen. Smith received no communication from General Bragg from the time he left Barboursville, on the 27th of August, until the 13this army to meet a small force of the enemy, while with the remnant he attacked their main columns. With even one-half of Smith's forces upon the field of Perryville a victory would have been gained, the fruitful consequences of which it would be di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. the wounding of Stonewall Jackson. (search)
fe of Leonidas Polk. I read also with interest a letter from Rev. H. E. Hayden. I will add another to the list of towns wantonly burnt by Federal officers during the war. There were no Confederate forces in this part of the country, when General Smith, belonging to General Grant's army, ordered this town to be burnt. All the houses around the square (except a small fire-proof store), the court-house, Jacob Thompson's residence, James Brown's house, and many other private dwellings were ded an officer ordered to burn the University. Finding only peaceful occupants, literary and philosophical apparatus, he said he would rather lose his commission than carry out such a vandal order, and so it was spared. The only reason that General Smith gave for such wanton destruction was, that he had heard that General Forrest was about to make a raid into Memphis! (100 miles away). The better reason may have been that it was the home of Jacob Thompson, Very Respectfully, P. H. Skipwit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
igade, Brigadier-General H. T. Hays; Gordon's Georgia Brigade, Brigadier-General John B. Gordon; Smith's Virginia Brigade, Brigadier-General William Smith; Hoke's North Carolina Brigade, Colonel AverBrigadier-General William Smith; Hoke's North Carolina Brigade, Colonel Avery, Sixth North Carolina Regiment, commanding (General Hoke absent, wounded). Rodes's Division--Major-General R. E. Rodes. Daniel's North Carolina Brigade, Brigadier-General Junius Daniel; Doles'sch was a bastion front open towards the town. Hays's brigade was designated for the attack, and Smith's for its support; and about 6 o'clock Colonel Jones ran his pieces and those of the 1st Virginison's position was the only one affording hopes of doing this to advantage, he was reinforced by Smith's brigade of Early's division, and Daniel's and Rodes's (old) brigades of Rodes's division. H The Fifty-fourth North Carolina regiment, of Hoke's brigade, and the Fifty-eighth Virginia, of Smith's brigade, Early's division, sent to Winchester from Staunton with prisoners, returned in time t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ues Life Memberships, and annual memberships, are still earnestly desired, and we beg our friends to help us, as they may be able to secure them. Cannot each subscriber send us at least one new one? And cannot some of our annual members become Life members, and gladden us with the fee ($50,) before the 1st of August? Our sets of back volumes are not, of course, inexhaustible, and we would advise those desiring them to send their orders at once, lest they may miss a full set. Prominent actors in our great struggle for constitutional freedom owe it alike to the cause, their comrades, and themselves, to put in shape for the future historian what they know about it, and we know of no better way to do this than by using the pages of our papers. We are glad to be able to announce that we begin in our next a series of papers by that gallant old veteran, General William Smith, of Virginia, who gives in most entertaining style some of his Reminiscences of the War.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the war. (search)
Reminiscences of the war. By General William Smith. Skirmish at Fairfax C. H., May 31st 1861. [None who knew him could fail to admire the enthusiastic courage with which Governor Wm. Smith, of Virginia, threw himself into the thickest of the fight for Southern independence, and gave an example of patience under hardships whGovernor Wm. Smith, of Virginia, threw himself into the thickest of the fight for Southern independence, and gave an example of patience under hardships which younger men might well have emulated. Now in his eighty fifth year; but with the clear intellect and retentive memory of his vigorous manhood, he proposes to write us some of his personal reminiscences of the great struggle. The following paper on the skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse, will be followed by one on the first batm to seek safety by retiring from the contest, through the fields of an adjoining farm. I have thus presented the facts of this little affair, most of which are within my personal knowledge, whilst those contributed by others have been adopted, only after the most patient investigation. Wm. Smith. Warrenton, Va., June, 1882.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen brave. (search)
Our fallen brave. By Miss Fannie H. Marr. [It seems appropriate to follow General Smith's account of the killing of Captain Marr, by the beautiful poem written by his sister, and read at the last Memorial day in Warrenton.] They lie 'neath many a marble shaft, Our noble, fallen brave; They lie on many a battle field, In many an unmarked grave. They lie by Honor guarded safe, In peaceful, dreamless rest; They lie by every valiant heart And patriot spirit bless'd. They come on these Memorial Days, They haunt the very air With scenes long passed, with forms long stilled, With words and deeds that were. They come to mourning household bands They come in heart and thought! They come in struggles they have made, In battles they have fought. They come,--and living voices speak Their names and deeds once more; We give a flower — a sigh — and then Memorial Day is o'er. O children, dear, who never saw The old Confederate gray; Who never saw our soldiers march With flag and drum away; Who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the First battle of Manassas. (search)
Reminiscences of the First battle of Manassas. By General Wm. Smith. I was appointed by Gov. Letcher, Colonel of the Forand certainly a splendid drill-master and tactician, and Major Smith, my nephew, a veteran soldier, just about three weeks frh-ll is that? To which I replied in a loud voice, I am Colonel Smith of the Forty-ninth Virginia Volunteers. To which Colono enemy in sight. On my flank I had suffered severely. Major Smith had been shot down in my lines — his leg broken just bel and a private of the same regiment, I presume, who held Major Smith in his arms until the fight was over, and he was relieved by the removal of Major Smith to Dogan's, near by, where he was confined for many weeks. It was about this time that Colonestimates 2,700 men. Forty-Ninth Virginia Volunteers, Col. Smith, 210 men. Officers killed, 1; men killed, 9; officers woers, Col. Smith, 210 men. Officers killed, 1; men killed, 9; officers wounded, 1; men wounded, 29-aggregate, 40. Wm. Smith
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
Hanner, A.: Johnson, Tyler; Jones, Jerry; Lanier, Wm.; McBurney, W.; McGuire, Jas.; McKenney, G.; Miles, W. P.; Mitchell, J. N.; Moore, F. A.; Morrison, J. B.; Moss, John; McDonald, J. L.; Moran, Wm., wounded at Price's X roads, but refused to leave his gun, killed at blockhouse near Baker's, on N. and C. railroad; Nepper, J. C.; Peel, Thos.; Priddy, M. C.; Prout, Josh; Prout, George; Powell, George; Reed, R. D.; Robinson, George; Sanders, Jas. L.; Scott, G. H.; Scott, J. M.; Siegel, Chas.; Smith, S. F.; Skeggs, Eugene; Southerland, Wm.; Stucker, Wm. G.; Summer, T. R.; Temple, C. R.; Thornton, A. R.; Taylor, J. G.; Wermesdoff, J.; Weaver, A. B.; Williams, Phil.; Woods, James C.; Wilson, W. W.; Wilson, T. J. Absentees in hospital and on furlough not reported. Non-commission officers, artificers and teamsters all took positions at the guns when a reduction of numbers required it. Rice's Battery. T. W. Rice, Captain, commanding. B. F. Haller, First Lieutenant. H. H. Bri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ess. General Early also bore strong testimony to the ability and gallantry of General Scales, who was true during the war and has not deserted since the war. He also paid a fitting tribute to Captain John Hampden Chamberlayne, who had died since the last reunion, and on motion of Judge George L. Christian the Association passed an appropriate tribute to the memory of this gallant soldier and distinguished citizen. In response to calls General Fitz Lee, Colonel R. E. Withers, and General Wm. Smith made stirring speeches. The officers of last year were unanimously re-elected. General Fitzhugh Lee expects to leave Richmond on Monday, November the 13th, to meet engagements to repeat, for the benefit of the Society, his superb lecture on Chancellorsville at Darlington, November 14th, Charleston, November, 16th, Atlanta, November 18th, Savannah, November 22d, Augusta, November 24th, and Rome, November 28th. Returning home from this latter point for a few days, General Lee wi
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