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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 179 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 85 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 65 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 47 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid. You can also browse the collection for Cheatham or search for Cheatham in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 13: (search)
sea, his best friends may well be surprised to find his book stained by unjust reflections upon Thomas. The following extracts from the Memoirs indicate the treatment which this branch of the subject receives: As soon as the army had reached Savannah, and had opened communication with the fleet, I endeavored to ascertain what had transpired in Tennessee since our departure. * * * * As before described, General Hood had three full corps of infantry—S. D. Lee's, A. P. Stewart's, and Cheatham's—at Florence, Alabama, with Forrest's corps of cavalry, numbering in the aggregate about forty-five thousand men. General Thomas was in Nashville, Tennessee, quietly engaged in reorganizing his army out of the somewhat broken forces at his disposal. He had posted his only two regular corps—the Fourth and Twenty-third—under the general command of Major-General J. M. Schofield, at Pulaski, directly in front of Florence, with the three brigades of cavalry (Hatch, Croxton, and Capron), comma
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 16: (search)
e misled by feints and false reports, and would, somehow, compel me to exercise more caution than I had hitherto done. I then overestimated his force at thirty-seven thousand infantry, supposed to be made up of S. D. Lee's corps, four thousand; Cheatham's, five thousand; Hope's, eight thousand; Hardee's, ten thousand; and other detachments, ten thousand; with Hampton's, Wheelers, and Butler's cavalry, about eight thousand. Of these, only Hardee and the cavalry were immediately in our front, whh. General Slocum brought forward the two divisions of the Twentieth Corps, hastily disposed of them for defense, and General Kilpatrick massed his cavalry on the left. General Jos. Johnston had the night before marched his whole army (Bragg, Cheatham, S. D. Lee, Hardee, and all the troops he had drawn from every quarter), determined, as he told his men, to crush one of our corps and then defeat us in detail He attacked General Slocum in position from 3 P. M. on the 19th till dark, but was ev