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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
12. the plan changed. Jackson's line. Franklin advances. Gibbon supports Meade. Meade strikes Gregg. the counter-stroke. Jackson's proposed attack. casualties. on the Federal right. the Formations. French and Hancock charge. Howard charges. Sturgis charges. sunken road Reenforced. Griffin's charge. Humphreys's first charge. Humphreys's second charge. Humphreys's report. Tyler's report. Getty's charge. Hawkins's account. a Federal conference. Dec. 14, sharp-shooting. Dec. 15, Burnside Retreats. flag of truce. casualties. New plans. the mud march. Burnside relieved. After the battle of Sharpsburg, rest, reorganization, and supplies were badly needed by both armies, and, as the initiative was now McClellan's, he determined not to move until he was thoroughly prepared. Lincoln had two months before drawn up his Emancipation Proclamation and was waiting for a victory to produce a favorable state of feeling for its issuance. Sharpsburg was now claimed as a
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
ble for Hood to attack at Nashville, but he hoped to fortify and threaten until he was attacked, and then to gain a victory. What a vain hope! Efforts were being made to bring troops from Texas across the Mississippi, which also, of course, proved vain. They never even started. His force was now reduced to about 18,000 infantry and 5000 cavalry, with which he took position before Nashville on Dec. 2. Here he intrenched himself and awaited Thomas's attack, which the latter delayed until Dec. 15. By this date he had accumulated a force of over 53,000 men. With these he attacked on the 15th, but with little success and with severe losses at points where he assailed Hood's intrenchments. On the 15th, the Federals renewed their assaults and during the morning were again repulsed. About 3 P. M., they massed a large force under cover behind a hill about Hood's left centre, and under cover of a heavy fire of artillery made a gallant charge and carried Hood's line, which, seeing the