Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Burnside or search for Burnside in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
les behind, when he felt uneasy about the long flank march. He sent for it about this time, but it arrived too late. Burnside's brigade he had weakly permitted Burnside to beg off for a rest, and to replenish ammunition. It was lying in the woodBurnside to beg off for a rest, and to replenish ammunition. It was lying in the woods, in rear of where it was first engaged in the morning, and from Burnside's report it lay there nearly five hours and was not again engaged. The third brigade missing from the fighting line was Keyes's. It had followed Sherman closely in its arriBurnside's report it lay there nearly five hours and was not again engaged. The third brigade missing from the fighting line was Keyes's. It had followed Sherman closely in its arrival on the field, and had borne some part in driving back the Confederate line. Then it had borne to its left, and gotten into the valley of Bull Run. There was no Confederate infantry there, but it took shelter in the valley from a few guns which henck19151650 Sherman20208253481 Richardsonnotengaged. Total58273423754 2D division. Hunter Porter84148245477 Burnside408861189 Total124236306666 3D division. Heintzelman Franklin7119726294 Wilcox71172186429 Howard50115180345 To
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 3: fall and winter of 1861 (search)
as in his first battle. Second. McClellan set out from Fortress Monroe via the York River. As we shall see, he had some success. His advance was within six miles of Richmond when he was beaten at Gaines Mill. He found a refuge on the James River, but his army was soon recalled to Washington. Third. Pope, in August, 1862, followed in McDowell's footsteps along the railroad from Alexandria, and was defeated upon nearly the same ground which had witnessed McDowell's defeat. Fourth. Burnside took the railroad via Fredericksburg, and in December, 1862, met a bloody repulse at that point and gave up his campaign. Fifth. Hooker also took the Fredericksburg route, but was attacked at Chancellorsville so severely that he also gave up his campaign early in May, 1863. Sixth. Meade, after repulsing Lee at Gettysburg in July, 1863, in November essayed an advance from Alexandria upon Lee's right flank at Mine Run, about halfway between the two railroad lines. He found Lee so stron
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 10: Cedar Mountain (search)
ed to attack him there, he tried another ruse. He fell back from the battlefield, not only to the south side of the Rapidan, where he might easily have halted and maintained himself, but he continued his retreat through Orange C. H. and on to Gordonsville. He hoped that Pope would construe the move as a confession of weakness and would be inspired by it and his own boastings to follow. This strategy was very nearly successful. On Aug. 12, Pope, having heard that the reenforcements under Burnside would soon join him, wired Halleck that, on their arrival, he would cross the Rapidan and advance upon Louisa C. H. This would have given the Confederates the very opportunity desired. On Aug. 13, Lee had ordered Longstreet and Hood, with 12 brigades, to proceed by rail to Gordonsville, and, on the 14th, he also ordered up Anderson's division of infantry, three brigades, and Stuart's cavalry. On the 15th he went up in person and took the command. The casualties at Cedar Mountain had be
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
tain, had decided to cross the Rapidan and advance upon Louisa C. H. Nothing could have suited Lee's plans better, but Halleck had not taken entire leave of his senses, and he no sooner heard of Pope's design to cross the Rapidan than he promptly forbade it. He also, in another letter, told Pope that he had much better be north of the Rappahannock. Lee's idea of the game the Federals should have played was to retreat to the north side of Bull Run. Pope's army had now been reenforced by Burnside, and numbered about 52,000 men. Its left flank rested near Raccoon Ford of the Rapidan, some four miles east of Mitchell Station on the O. & A. R. R. His centre was at Cedar Mountain, and his right on Robertson's River, about five miles west of the railroad. He was, therefore, directly opposite Gordonsville, where Jackson's forces had arrived on the 13th. About two miles below Rapidan Station was a high hill called Clark's Mountain, close to the Rapidan, and giving from its top an exte
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
bleday, Patrick, Gibbon4 HookerRickettsDuryea, Christian, Hartsuff2 MeadeSeymour, Magilton, Gallagher4 2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgisNagle, Ferrero2 RodmanFairchild, Harland1 CoxSeammon, Crook3 12 CorpsWilliamsCrawford, Gordon3 MansfieldGreeneTyndale, Stainrook, Goodrich4 CavalryPleasantonWhiting, Farnsworth, Rush, McReynolds, Davis4 Aggregate6 Corps, 19 Divisions54 Brigades, 300 Guns, 97,000 Men55 could defend himself, but the suggestion was not adopted by Miles, who felt himself obliged by his orders to hold the village itself. As Lee could not advance freely into Pennsylvania with Miles's force so close
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
d. both sides exhausted. Pleasanton and Porter. Burnside advances. Toombs's good defence. the Bridge carro turn their left flank, while the 9th corps under Burnside, about 10,000, should attack their right at Burnsir left and on their centre, just at the time when Burnside was beginning to get in serious work upon their ri4, 1863, McClellan writes that he sent an order to Burnside to carry the bridge in front of him at 8 A. M., bu62, he says the order was communicated at 10 A. M. Burnside's report, dated Sept. 30, gives the same hour. Geeam, gave little shelter from the enemy's fire. Burnside's corps comprised four divisions of two brigades e, more urgent orders from McClellan were coming to Burnside, and being reiterated by him to his subordinates a forded the Potomac. Having crossed the bridge, Burnside's first task was to secure his possession of it, ahe air of shells and shrapnel over the field where Burnside made his advance and was beaten back by A. P. Hill
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
nded. earthworks erected. Jackson Arrives. Burnside's plan. Marye's Hill. building the bridges.omulgated for two days. The designation of Burnside to succeed McClellan was a great surprise to fighter. Moved by the wishes of his friends, Burnside was brought to accept the command rather thanwerful army. As before stated, on Nov. 15, Burnside commenced his movement upon Fredericksburg, S the enemy to cross, though under orders from Burnside not to do so. For under the superior metal oby crossing the river above and coming down. Burnside had deliberately changed this plan, after sta. When this state of affairs was reported to Burnside, he ordered every gun in range of the city to during the day. They numbered about 26,000. Burnside's position during the battle was at the Philluller explanation, and endeavored to dissuade Burnside from what he was sure would be a hopeless effrnside would confess defeat by retreating. Burnside himself, however, was far from having given u[46 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
of a Mr. Corbin, at Moss Neck, 11 miles below Fredericksburg. Longstreet was encamped from a little above Fredericksburg to Massaponax Creek. Lee established his headquarters in a camp a short distance in rear of Hamilton's Crossing. Most of the artillery was sent back to the North Anna River for convenience of supply. My own battalion occupied a wood at Mt. Carmel church, five miles north of Hanover Junction, the horses being sheltered in an adjoining pine thicket. On the occasion of Burnside's Mud March, we marched about halfway to Fredericksburg, but were then allowed to return. The infantry generally did not leave their camps, as there was nowhere any fighting. Although so near to Richmond, the army was inadequately clothed, shod, and fed, in spite of Lee's earnest efforts. As far back as April 28, 1862, the meat ration had been reduced from 12 to 8 ounces, and a small extra allowance of flour (two ounces) was given. It was claimed that but for this reduction, the suppl
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
ded, soon after the battle of Chancellorsville, in a council between Mr. Lincoln, Halleck, and Stanton, that Hooker should never again be intrusted with the conduct of a battle. He could not be at once removed on account of the support of politicians who desired to have Secretary Chase succeed Mr. Lincoln as President. This party, with the active aid of Chase, had placed Hooker in his position by turning the scale in his favor, when the choice was between Hooker and Meade, as successor to Burnside. They still supported Hooker strongly, and a dead-lock was only averted by Chase's friends consenting to a change of the commander in case Hooker should voluntarily resign. The secret of Chase's interest lay in the fact that Hooker had pledged himself not to become a candidate for the Presidency, should he win a great victory. Meanwhile, as he was not to be allowed to fight, both Halleck and Lincoln refused his sensible proposition to cross the Rappahannock, and Lincoln wrote him the
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
force, surrendered without a fight. Already Burnside had occupied Knoxville, leaving us only the lant and Sherman approaching from the west, or Burnside, near at hand and threatening on the east, anver, and that his own force for the attack of Burnside at Knoxville should be increased to 20,000 metold, Longstreet was ordered to march against Burnside in E. Tenn., with McLaws's and Hood's divisioes were driven by the roads. The forces of Burnside at Knoxville consisted of four small divisionly kept on the north bank on our left flank. Burnside was ordered not to oppose Longstreet's advanc and the Confederates 22 killed, 152 wounded. Burnside withdrew into Knoxville that night and Longst intention to attack. Very soon after this Burnside sent out a flag and offered us a truce to rem approach of a force under Sherman to relieve Burnside, and that our road to Dalton was closed. Tcluded in the above. Return of casualties, Burnside's command, Nov. 14 to Dec. 4, 1863 DIVISIONB[2 more...]
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