Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Hunter or search for Hunter in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
d Stone Bridge and leads to Manassas. McDowell's plan was as follows: Tyler with three brigades was to take position opposite the Stone Bridge, make demonstrations, and be prepared to cross. McDowell in person would conduct the five brigades of Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions by the circuitous road, cross Bull Run at Sudley Ford, and attack Stone Bridge in the rear. As soon as it was carried Tyler's three brigades would cross, and the eight brigades, united behind our left flank, could e826 6th N. C. (1 regiments)235073 total282107311356 total3801565131958 Federal. 1st division. Tyler KILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Keyes1950154223 Schenck19151650 Sherman20208253481 Richardsonnotengaged. Total58273423754 2D division. Hunter Porter84148245477 Burnside408861189 Total124236306666 3D division. Heintzelman Franklin7119726294 Wilcox71172186429 Howard50115180345 Total1924843921068 5TH division. Miles Blenker61694116 Davies1214 Total71895120 Aggrega
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
d the make believe of siege operations was going on, Halleck suggested to him the investment of Richmond on the north bank of the James. It was seriously considered, as offering greater security to Washington, but finally rejected. On June 5, Hunter, in the Valley, who had succeeded Milroy, defeated Jones, who had succeeded Breckenridge. As soon as Lee learned of this, he ordered Breckenridge to return and take with him the troops he had brought to Lee at Hanover Junction. On June 12, he took the bold move of detaching Early's whole corps and sending it to the Valley, by way of Charlottesville. It was ordered to attack Hunter in rear, and, having disposed of him and united with Breckenridge, to move down the Valley, cross the Potomac, and threaten Washington. It is probable that in deciding upon this line of strategy, Lee was influenced by hopes that strong demonstrations against Washington might recall Grant's army for its protection, as had so often happened before. If so, h
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
gon by a roundabout road into the town. Between July 6 and 9, Grant had found it necessary to send the three divisions of the 6th corps to Washington to oppose Early and Breckenridge. These, whom we saw sent by Lee, from Cold Harbor, to check Hunter's advance upon Lynchburg, had reached Lynchburg before him. Hunter feared either to attack, or to retreat by the way he had come. After a pause of two days he started, on June 19, through W. Va. via the Great Kanawha, the Ohio River, and the BalHunter feared either to attack, or to retreat by the way he had come. After a pause of two days he started, on June 19, through W. Va. via the Great Kanawha, the Ohio River, and the Baltimore and Ohio R. R. to Harper's Ferry. This left the valley open. Early at once moved down it to demonstrate against Washington. The only force available to oppose him was Wallace's command from Baltimore, with Ricketts's division of the 6th corps, which was the first to arrive. Early had crossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown and moved through the passes of South Mountain. On July 9, he attacked and defeated Wallace on the Monocacy. The next day he moved upon Washington, Wallace being d
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
ly than at any other period of the contest. What these concessions might have been was suggested in the conference held at Fortress Monroe on Jan. 30, between Messrs. Lincoln and Seward, and the commissioners sent by Mr. Davis, Messrs. Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell. After this conference adjourned, without coming to any agreement, there were rumors that Mr. Lincoln had offered to pay the South $400,000,000 in bonds as compensation for the slaves, if the South would return to the Union. This n Lee and Grant for the purpose of surrender, and if Gen. Sheridan decides to continue the fighting in the face of the flag of truce, the responsibility for the bloodshed will be his and not mine. On this, Gordon says, Custer rode off with Maj. Hunter of Gordon's staff, asking to be guided to Longstreet's position. Finding Longstreet, he made the same demand for immediate and unconditional surrender. I have told of this scene elsewhere Century, April, 1903. more at length, but did not kn