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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

Your search returned 46 results in 9 document sections:

Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
e south side in a line convex toward Richmond, and scarcely six miles away at its nearest point. In observation of McDowell at Fredericksburg was Gen. J. R. Anderson at Hanover Junction with about 9000 men; and near Hanover C. H. was Branch's brigade, about 4500. Johnston directed that these forces should be drawn behind the Chickahominy, on our left, and united into a new division under A. P. Hill. Before this could be accomplished, however, Branch was attacked by Morell's division and Warren's brigade of Porter's corps, and was forced back with a loss of about 300 killed and wounded, and 700 prisoners, the enemy reporting 62 killed, 223 wounded, and 70 missing, total 355. At Fredericksburg, McDowell's column was at last joined by Shields, who had been detached from Banks in the Valley, and on May 26 McDowell was put in motion. In the forenoon of the 27th notice of his advance reached Johnston, who at once recognized that he must now attack before McDowell could unite with Mc
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
ndleton's Reserve, 58 Guns12 CavalryStuartHampton, Lee F., Robertson, 14 Guns3 Aggregate2 Corps, 10 Divisions43 Brigades, 284 guns, 55,000 Men67 CORPSDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTS. 1st CorpsKingPhelps, Doubleday, Patrick, Gibbon4 HookerRickettsDuryea, Christian, Hartsuff2 MeadeSeymour, Magilton, Gallagher4 2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgisNagle, Ferrero2 RodmanFairchild, Harland1 CoxSeammon, Crook3 12 CorpsWilliamsCrawford, Gordon3 MansfieldGreeneTyndale, Stainrook, Goodrich4 CavalryPleasantonWhiting, Farnsworth, Rush, McReynolds, Davis4 Aggregate6 Corps, 19 Divisions54 Brigades, 300 Guns, 97,000 Men55 could de
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
, Dole's, Colquitt's, Iverson's, Ramseur's H. P. Jones's Battalion, 5 Batteries, 22 Guns6,944 A. P. Hill'sField's, Gregg's, Thomas's, Lane's, Archer's, Pender's Walker's Battalion, 7 Batteries, 28 Guns11,554 Taliaferro'sPaxton's, J. R. Jones's, Warren's, Pendleton's Brockenbrough's Battalion, 5 Batteries, 22 Guns5,478 Total4 Divisions, 18 Brigades, 23 Batteries, 98 Guns31,692 Stuart's Cavalry Brigades, Hampton's, Lee F., Lee, W. H. F., Jones's, W. E.; Pelham's Artillery 5 Batteries, 22 Guns9errero Hawkins, Harland6 Batteries Centre Grand Division3d CorpsBirneyRobinson, Ward, Berry StonemanSickles WhippleCarr, Hall, Revere Piatt, Carroll9 Batteries Hooker5th CorpsGriffinBarnes, Sweitzer, Stockton ButterfieldSykesBuchanan, Andrew, Warren8 Batteries HumphreysTyler, Allabach Left Grand Division1st CorpsDoubledayPhelps, Rogers, Gavin, Meredith ReynoldsGibbon MeadeRoot, Lyle, Taylor Sinclair, Magilton, Jackson11 Batteries Franklin6th CorpsBrooksTorbert, Cake, Russell W. F. Smith
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
mseur, Doles, Iverson418 Early's8,243Gordon, Hoke, Smith, Hays418 Colston's6,629Paxton, Jones, Warren, Nichols418 900Corps' Reserve Artillery983 4 Divisions35,79519 Brigades27118 600General Reser brigades formed in line with Ramseur, and in the following order from the left: Nichols, Jones, Warren. About half of each division was on each side of the pike, and two Napoleons of Breathed's horsand pursuit of the 11th corps: to wit, Rodes, Doles, and Iverson of Rodes's division, and Jones, Warren, and Nichols of Colston's division. The great advantage of the Confederates lay in their being ost desirable whenever important orders are issued. He despatched a competent staff-officer, Gen. Warren, his chief engineer, to supervise their execution. Unfortunately for him, however, under theer had sent urgent orders the night before to Sedgwick to come to his help, and a staff-officer, Warren, to supervise their execution. But Sedgwick, though already on the south side of the river, whi
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
found the enemy in position on the top of the latter. Quite a sharp action ensued, which may be described here, out of its order in time, as it was entirely isolated. Three companies of the 47th Ala. were detached and left on picket at the foot of the mountain. The remaining force was but about 500 men under the command of Col. Oates of the 15th Ala. The mountain had been partially occupied in the morning by the 3d corps, but was vacated when they moved to the front. About 4 P. M., Gen. Warren, seeing the deployment of our lines, had brought up Vincent's brigade of Barnes's division of the 5th corps. Swinton has written that a foot-race occurred for the commanding position, and that a desperate hand-to-hand fight with bayonets and clubbed muskets took place for a half-hour between Hood's Texans and Vincent's men. None of the official reports on either side are consistent with this story. There was some sharp fighting and Vincent was killed, but Oates's small and isolated f
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
rcements were sent Hancock, while Sedgwick and Warren were ordered to press their attacks. Getty waitz-Lee reported himself as heavily pressed by Warren's corps of infantry, and the increasing musket's to his right. It was now about midday, and Warren's corps had been fought to a standstill. Abd on that flank and perhaps been reenforced by Warren, it is hard to see how he could have failed to Longstreet's front opposite Warren. At dawn, Warren had opened all his guns and pressed forward hipets and firing slowly in reply to the enemy. Warren saw no encouragement to attempt an attack, so fered a location. It had been intended to use Warren's corps in a fresh attack upon the Angle, but with bonfires and men posted along the route, Warren only arrived on time with about 4000 men. The d did not attempt it. Hancock on his left, and Warren on his right, each advanced skirmishers and feon Early next morning in flank and rear, while Warren and Burnside attacked in front. No long des[15 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 21: the movement against Petersburg (search)
day, the 13th, after an all-night march of about 30 miles. The 5th corps, under Warren, held its position covering the passage of other corps until night of the 13th,rury's Bluff. His cavalry came in contact with Wilson's cavalry, and also with Warren's infantry, which had intrenched itself on the Long Bridge road not far in front of his position. Some sharp skirmishing took place, as shown by Warren's report of 300 casualties. The presence of Warren was taken as assurance that Grant's armyWarren was taken as assurance that Grant's army was about to advance on the north side of the James, and Warren's withdrawal at dark, discovered the next day, was supposed to mean only a drawing nearer to Butler'sWarren's withdrawal at dark, discovered the next day, was supposed to mean only a drawing nearer to Butler's position, where the narrowness of the river would permit the easy establishment of pontoon bridges. On the 14th, a staff-officer of Beauregard's came over from Petg, established his corps within a hundred yards of the enemy's main line. . . . Warren's assault was well made, some of Griffin's men being killed within 20 feet of t
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
eiseger's with a portion of Elliott's which drove the enemy back and which caused the retreat from the rear of their lines of many who had been sheltered within them. These suffered severely by our fire from the flanks as they crossed the open spaces behind, under fire from the guns upon both flanks and infantry as well. This retreat under such severe fire was seen in the Federal lines, just in time to put a stop to an attack upon our right flank, about to be made by Ayres's division of Warren's corps, which had been ordered to capture the one-gun battery on our right, as they called the one at which Gibbes had been wounded. Humphreys calls this a two-gun battery. There were two embrasures and two guns, but only one used. The other did not bear where desired. There was very little infantry supporting this gun, or able to reach it, without exposure. Ayres's attack would probably have been successful. He was about to go forward, when Meade directed all offensive operation
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
ion nearly to Dinwiddie C. H. Night ended the fighting, with Pickett so far in advance that he would have been cut off by Warren's corps, during the night, had he waited until morning. But he fell back, and took position in the morning at Five Forks force of cavalry on Pickett's right, with the 5th corps he turned his left flank and routed him, capturing, as stated by Warren, 3244 men, 11 colors, and 4 guns, with a loss of only 634 men. The Federal Gen., Winthrop, was killed, and on the ConfedeNeither were on the field until the action was decided. Although this action was a complete success, after it was over Warren was removed from the command of the 5th corps by Sheridan, under charges of which Warren was afterward fully acquitted byWarren was afterward fully acquitted by a Court of Inquiry. When Grant heard at 9 P. M. of Sheridan's success, he was assured that he must now have Lee's long lines stretched to near the breaking strain, and that the time had come when he could renew his assaults, suspended since the o