Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Seth Williams or search for Seth Williams in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 10: Cedar Mountain (search)
on's division, slightly over 300 in each. The Federal losses were in eight brigades of infantry and one of cavalry. Crawford's brigade lost 857, Geary's 465, Prince's 452, and Gordon's 344. The fighting upon Jackson's left, where Garnett's and Taliaferro's brigades were broken by the charge of Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, and the line reestablished, by Branch's, Archer's, and Winder's brigades, was very desperate, as is shown by the casualties of some of the Federal regiments. Gen. Williams, in his official report, says: — The 3d Wis., especially, fell under a partial flank fire from the underbrush, and woods, which swept its right companies with great destruction, and under which Lt.-Col. Crane fell pierced with several fatal wounds, and the regiment was obliged to give way. The enemy was, however, driven out of the open field by the other regiments and some distance into the woods, where, being strongly reenforced, their fire became overwhelming. No better proof of it
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
ilton, Gallagher4 2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgisNagle, Ferrero2 RodmanFairchild, Harland1 CoxSeammon, Crook3 12 CorpsWilliamsCrawford, Gordon3 MansfieldGreeneTyndale, Stainrook, Goodrich4 CavalryPleasantonWhiting, Farnsworth, Rush, McReynolds, Davis4 Aggregate6 Corps, 19 Divisions54 Brigades, 300 Guns, 97,000 Men55 could defend himself, but the suggestion was not adopted by Miles, who felt himself obliged by his orders to hold the village itself. As Lee could not advance freely into Pennsylvania with Miles's force so close in his rear, he determined to capture the Harper's Ferry garrison. Discussing the matt
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
f the Dunker Church and a portion of the woods near it. But the 12th corps had now, itself, lost all of its aggressiveness, and was glad to pause and await reenforcement. Mansfield had been killed early in the action, and his corps now under Williams had sustained a loss of 1746 men out of 8000. Williams's division had suffered so severely that it was withdrawn to the rear to rest and replenish ammunition. Here may be said to end in a draw the second affair. The combatants upon both sideWilliams's division had suffered so severely that it was withdrawn to the rear to rest and replenish ammunition. Here may be said to end in a draw the second affair. The combatants upon both sides were worn out to frazzles, and the firing had ceased entirely. The remnant of Hood's division was also withdrawn to replenish ammunition. The Tex. brigade under Wofford had lost 548 men out of 864 carried into action. The 1st Tex. regiment had lost 45 killed, 141 wounded, and 12 missing from 227. Law's brigade had lost 454. But this truce was of short duration. From the northwest heavy masses of blue, and from the south long lines of gray, were marching rapidly toward the fields, alrea
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 13,450GearyCandy, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAv for reenforcements, had also received Barlow's brigade from the right flank of the 11th corps, Williams's division of the 12th corps, and three regiments of cavalry and some horse artillery under Ple line in front of Fairview, where it approached the position of Knipe's and Ruger's brigades of Williams's division of the 12th corps. Hearing their noisy approach, and believing them to be Confedehole line by Hill's division. The enemy's advanced line crossed the Plank road and was held by Williams's division of the 12th corps, Berry's of the 3d corps, and Hays's brigade of the 2d corps. In Steinwehr's Div.27248244519 Schurz's Div.129496298923 Total 11th Corps2171,2219742,41212,927 Williams's Div.1358016761,612 Geary's Div.1256374441,206 Total 12th Corps2601,4411,1212,82213,450 Dev
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
dless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,580Engineers, Provost Guard's Escorts 100,2837 Corps, 19 Divisions, 51 Brigades, Infantry andl the corps had been hastened to find the defensive battle-field; and their arrivals upon it had been about as follows: — Geary's division of the 12th corps had arrived about 6 P. M. and was placed on the left of the Federal line by Hancock. Williams's division of the same corps bivouacked near Rock Creek Bridge that night. The advance of the 3d corps came upon the field about sunset. During the night, or early in the morning, the entire corps arrived. The 2d corps, having come from T
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
wo or three guns could be brought off the field. Hunt's report says:— The batteries were exposed to heavy front and enfilading fires and suffered terribly, but as rapidly as any were disabled they were retired and replaced by others. Besides the reenforcements of 12 brigades already mentioned (including Crawford's Pa. reserves), Meade had followed them with Robinson's and Doubleday's divisions of the 1st corps, five brigades (taken from the lines in front of Hill's corps), and with Williams's division, three brigades of the 12th corps. Two more brigades, Candy's and Cobham's, of Geary's division of the 12th corps, were also withdrawn from the intrenchments upon Culp's Hill, and ordered to the left, but they missed their road and did not reach the scene of action in time. These withdrawals left of the 12th corps but a single brigade, Greene's, holding the intrenchments upon Culp's Hill in front of Johnson's division of Ewell's corps, who had been all day under orders to attac
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
ral casualties. Gettysburg by divisions COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Wadsworth2991,2296272,155 Robinson916169831,690 Rowley2651,2965412,103 Wainwright's Arty.98611106 1st Corps6663,1312,1626,059 Caldwell1878802081,275 Gibbon3441,2121011,647 Hays238987661,291 Hazard's Arty.271193149 2d Corps7973,1943784,369 Birney2711,3843562,011 Humphreys3141,5622162,092 Randolph's Arty.88117106 3d Corps5933,0295894,211 Barnes167594142904 Ayres164802631,029 Crawford261813210 Martin832243 5th Corps3651,6112112,187 Federal casualties. Gettysburg by divisions COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Wright11718 Howe212216 Newton2014828196 Tompkins's Arty.4812 6th Corps2718530242 Barlow1226775071,306 Steinwehr107507332946 Schurz1336846591476 Osborn's Arty.753969 11th Corps3691,9221,5103,801 Williams9640631533 Geary10839735540 Muhlenberg's Arty.99 12th Corps214812661,082 Arty. Reserve4318712242 Gen. Headquarters44 Cavalry91354407852 Aggregate3,15514,5295,36523,049
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
the battle. Bryan Names in italics arrived too late for the battle. HoodLaw, Robertson, Benning, Jenkins, Names in italics arrived too late for the battle. Anderson Names in italics arrived too late for the battle. Res. Arty.BatteriesWilliams, 4; Robertson, 5; Alexander, 6 Names in italics arrived too late for the battle.9 Total Inf. and Arty., 33 Brigades, 174 Guns. Effective total 52,066 WheelerWhartonO'Rews, Harrison1 CavalryMartinMorgan, Russell1 ForrestArmstrongWheeler, time. The bayonet was sometimes used, and men were killed with clubbed muskets. This was kept up from 2 to 6 P. M., during which time the infantry fire was incessant and tremendous. About 5 P. M. Longstreet succeeded in getting 11 guns under Williams into position, whence their fire could take in flank and rear the positions of Thomas's four left divisions; but the distance was about 900 yards, and the effect was not immediate. About 6 P. M. the Confederates on the right flank, who had la
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
onvince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lt.-Gen. Lee, at that moment, happened to be near Mahone's lines, and within an hour the following reply was delivered to Gen. Seth Williams, the bearer:— April 7, 1865. General: I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion of blood, and therefore, before considering your proposition, ask the terms you will offer on condition of its surrender. R. E. Lee, Gen. The next day, the 8th, was the first quiet day of our retreat. The 2d