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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,245 1,245 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 666 666 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 260 260 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 197 197 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 190 190 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 93 93 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 88 88 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 82 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 79 79 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1861 AD or search for 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 666 results in 582 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abercrombie, John Joseph, 1802-1877 (search)
Abercrombie, John Joseph, 1802-1877 Military officer; born in Tennessee in 1802; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1822. Entering the 1st Infantry, he was its adjutant from 1825 to 1833. Serving in Florida and Mexico, he was promoted to brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallantry in the battle of Monterey, where he was severely wounded. He was commissioned lieutenant-colonel in May, 1852, and colonel in February, 1861, and was brevetted brigadier-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865. In June following he retired. He was a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Civil War, and commanded a brigade in Patterson's division on the Upper Potomac in 1861. He was transferred to Bank's division in July. Early in 1862 he joined the Army of the Potomac, and was slightly wounded in the battle of fair Oaks (q. v.). He died in Roslyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolitionists. (search)
1835. On Nov. 7, 1837, Elijah P. Lovejoy (q. v.), a Presbyterian minister, who had established an abolition newspaper in Alton, Ill., was mobbed and shot to death. These occurrences did not cease entirely until the beginning of the Civil War. in 1861. In the South rewards were offered for the capture of prominent abolitionists, and a suspension of commercial intercourse was threatened. The Southern States objected to the use of the mails for the circulation of anti-slavery literature. A bil an auxiliary than as an integral part of the party. During the period 1850-60 the most active exertions of the abolitionists were centred in assisting fugitive slaves to reach places of safety in Canada (see fugitive slave law and underground Railway). The result of the Civil War (1861-65) was the total abolition of slavery in all the States. Soon after the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment, the publication of The liberator ceased and the Anti-Slavery Society dissolved, as natural results.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles, 1785-1861 (search)
Adams, Charles, 1785-1861 Lawyer: born in Arlington, Vt., March 12, 1785: educated himself for college, and was graduated at the University of Vermont in 1804. During the Canadian difficulties of 1838 he was the friend and legal adviser of General Wool, and subsequently wrote a history of the events of that uprising under the title of The patriot War. He attained a large practice in his profession, and was a voluminous contributor to periodical literature on the public events of his day. He died in Burlington, Vt., Feb. 13, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry, 1838- (search)
Adams, Henry, 1838- Historian; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 16, 1838; third son of Charles Francis, st; was graduated at Harvard College in 1858; acted as private secretary to his father while the latter was American minister to Great Britain, in 1861-68; was Associate Professor of History at Harvard in 1870-77; and editor of the North American review in 1870-76. His principal works are, Historical essays; Documents relating to New England Federalism; History of the United States from 1801 to 1817 (9 volumes).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry C. (search)
Adams, Henry C. Born in Davenport, Ia., 1861. Graduated from Iowa College, 1874. Professor of Political Economy in the University of Michigan since 1887. Director of the division of transportation of the eleventh census; statistician to Interstate Commerce Commission since 1887; president American Economic Association from 1895-97. He has written Lectures on political Economy ; State in relation to industrial action; Public debts; The Science of finance.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Edward Porter, 1835- (search)
Alexander, Edward Porter, 1835- Engineer; born in Washington, Ga., May 26, 1835; was graduated at the United States Military Academy, and commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Engineer Corps in 1857, resigned and entered the Confederate army in 1861; served with the Army of Northern Virginia from the beginning to the close of the war, attaining the rank of brigadier-general and chief of ordnance. In 1866-70 he was Professor of Mathematies and Engineering in the University of South Carolina; in 1871-92 engaged in railroad business; and in 1892-94 was a member of the Boards on Navigation of the Columbia River, Ore., and on the ship-canal between Chesapeake and Delaware bays. Subsequently he was engineer-arbitrator of the boundary survey between Costa Rica and Nicaragua.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ethan, 1737- (search)
lature of Vermont, and as a delegate in Congress, he secured the great object of his efforts — namely, the ultimate recognition of Vermont as an independent State. He removed to Burlington before the close of the war, and died there Feb. 13, 1780. In 1894 the United States government established a new military post 5 miles from Burlington and named it after him. See Ethan Allen. Fort. lawyer; born in Monmouth county, N. J., May 12, 1832; was graduated at Brown University in 1860. At the beginning of the Civil War he raised a brigade of troops, but did not enter the service. In 1861-69 he was deputy United States attorney for the Southern District of New York; in 1870-90 practised law in New York City; and in the Presidential campaign of 1872 was chairman of the National Liberal Republican Committee. Subsequently he was president of the Cuban League of the United States. He is the author of Washington, or the Revolution, a history of the American Revolution in dramatic for
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ambulance service. (search)
Ambulance service. The benevolent work of the Volunteer Refreshment Saloons of Philadelphia during 1861-65 was Philadelphia. Firemen's ambulance. supplemented by a good work carried on wholly by the firemen of that city. When sick and wounded soldiers began to be brought to the hospitals in Philadelphia, the medical department found it difficult to procure proper vehicles to convey them from the wharves to their destination. The distress caused by delays and inconvenient conveyances the sympathetic firemen attempted to alleviate. An arrangement was made for the chief of the department to announce the arrival of a transport by a given signal, when the firemen would hasten to the landing-place with spring-wagons. Finally, the Northern liberties engine Company had a fine ambulance constructed. More than thirty other engine and hose companies followed their example, and the suffering soldiers were conveyed from slip to hospital with the greatest tenderness. These ambulances c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Adelbert, 1835- (search)
Ames, Adelbert, 1835- Military officer; born in Rockland, Me., Oct. 31, 1835; was graduated at West Point in 1861; and for his gallant conduct in the Battle of Bull Run (1861) was brevetted major. He served in the campaigns on the Peninsula in 1862. At Chancellorsville he led a brigade, also at Gettysburg, in 1863, and before Petersburg, in 1864, he commanded a division. In the expedition against Fort Fisher, near the close of that year, he commanded a division of colored troops, and aft1861) was brevetted major. He served in the campaigns on the Peninsula in 1862. At Chancellorsville he led a brigade, also at Gettysburg, in 1863, and before Petersburg, in 1864, he commanded a division. In the expedition against Fort Fisher, near the close of that year, he commanded a division of colored troops, and afterwards led the same in North Carolina. In the spring of 1865 he was brevetted major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general, U. S. A. In 1871 he was a representative of Mississippi in the United States Senate; was governor in 1874; and was appointed a brigadier-general of volunteers June 20, 1898, serving through the war with Spain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ammen, Daniel, 1820-1898 (search)
Ammen, Daniel, 1820-1898 Naval officer; born in Brown county, O., May 15, 1820; entered the navy as a midshipman in 1836. In 1861-62 he commanded the gunboat Seneca in the South Atlantic blockading fleet. His bravery was conspicuous in the battle of Port Royal, Nov. 7, 1861. Later, under Dupont's command, he took part in all the operations on the coasts of Georgia and. Florida. In the engagements with Fort McAllister, March 3, 1863, and with Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863, he commanded the monitor Patapsco. In the attacks on Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865, he commanded the Mohican. He was promoted to rear-admiral in 1877, and was retired June 4, 1878. Afterwards he was a member of the board to locate the new Naval Observatory, and a representative of the United States at the Interoceanic Ship Canal Congress in Paris. He designed a cask balsa to facilitate the landing of troops and field artillery; a life-raft for steamers; and the steel ram Katahdin. His pu
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