hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 516 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 45 45 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 6 6 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 3 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1900 AD or search for 1900 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 516 results in 387 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbey, Edwin Austin, 1852- (search)
Abbey, Edwin Austin, 1852- Painter; born in Philadelphia. April 1, 1852; was educated at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts, and in 1871 entered the publishing house of Harper & Brothers, for which he went to England in 1878. He became widely noted for his book illustrations, and in 1890 exhibited his first painting, A May day morning. He became an associate of the Royal Academy and of the Royal Water Color Society in London, and was an American juror on painting at the Paris Exposition of 1900. The last of his notable works in the United States was the design of a series of paintings illustiating the Holy Grail for the walls of the new Public Library in Boston. In March, 1901, he was commissioned by King Edward VII. to paint the scene of his coronation in Westminster Abbey.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adventists, (search)
Adventists, Also known as Millerites, a sect in the United States founded by William Miller, who believed that the second coming of Christ would occur in October, 1843. As the expected event did not occur on the first nor succeeding days set for it. the number of believers decreased very largely. The Adventists of to-day still look for the coming of Christ, but do not fix a definite time for it. In 1900 the Adventists were divided into six bodies: Evangelical, Advent Christians, Seventh-Day, Church of God, Life and Advent Union, and Churches of God in Jesus Christ, and together reportedly 1,491 minister, 2,267 churches, and 89,482 communicants. See Miller, William.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), African Methodist Episcopal Church, (search)
African Methodist Episcopal Church, A religious sect established in Philadelphia in 1816, by colored members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The first bishop chosen by the convention that founded the Church was the Rev. Richard Allen. In 1794, under his direction, the first church for colored Methodists in the United States was built in Philadelphia. The government and doctrine of the Church is substantially the same as that of the body from which it withdrew. Its territory is divided into two annual conferences, and it has a general conference which meets once every four years. In 1900 it reported as follows: Ministers, 5,559; churches, 5,775; and members, 673,504.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), African Methodist Episcopal Church, Zion (search)
African Methodist Episcopal Church, Zion A religious sect, founded in New York City in 1796. This organization sprang from a desire of colored members of the Methodist Episcopal Church to have a separate spiritual fellowship that they might be more helpful to each other. The first annual conference, however, was not held until 1821. James Varich was elected bishop in the following year. Until 1880 bishops held office for four years only, but in that year an act was passed making the bishopric a life office. The territory of this Church is divided into seven districts, over each of which there is a bishop. In 1900 it reported as follows: Ministers, 3,155; churches, 2,906; and members, 536,271.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agriculture. (search)
tes than the statement of the value of the exports of the products of agriculture during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. Impressive as these figures are, it should be borne in mind that they represent the surplus of production over domestic requirements. The total domestic exports aggregated in value $1,370,476,158, and of this total the share of agricultural products was $835,912,952, or 60.99 per cent. of the entire value. In the preceding year the percentage was 65.19; but in 1899-1900 the exports of domestic manufactures increased to an unprecedented extent, and caused a lowering of the agricultural percentage. In the period quoted the export of agricultural implements rose in value to $16,094,886. The following details, covering the calendar year 1899, show still more strikingly the great value of this industry and its most productive crops: Wheat, acreage under cultivation, 44,592,516; production, in bushels, 547,303,846; value, $319,545,259--corn, acreage, 82,108,58
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1870- (search)
d. He protested against the Spanish-American treaty of peace, which ceded the Philippine Islands to the United States, and on the evening of Feb. 4, 1899, his troops attacked the American lines in the suburbs of Manila. This caused the immediate ratification of the treaty by the United States Senate. The Filipinos, under Aguinaldo, made a strong resistance to the Americans, and it was not till after the close of the rainy season that they could be followed up in the open field. Early in 1900 the organized insurrection, which was chiefly confined to the Tagalog nationality, was broken up. Aguinaldo was driven into hiding, and reports of his death had persistent circulation. Later in the year, the insurgents, encouraged by the possible change of administration in the United States, actively renewed hostilities; but, discouraged by their repeated failures in their attacks on the American troops, and the news of the re-election of President McKinley, they began giving up the struggl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
year a convention formed a new constitution for the State, which was ratified Feb. 4, 1868. State officers and members of Congress having been duly chosen, and all requirements complied with, Alabama became entitled to representation in Congress; and on July 14, 1868, the military relinquished to the civil authorities all legal control. The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the national Constitution were ratified by Alabama, the latter Nov. 16, 1870. Population in 1890, 1,508,073; in 1900, 1,828,697. Governors of the Mississippi Territory. Including the present States of Alabama and Mississippi. Names.Term of office. Winthrop Sargent1799 to 1801 Wm. C. C. Claiborne1801 to 1805 Robt. Williams1805 to 1809 David Holmes1809 to 1817 Governor of the Territory of Alabama. Wm. Wyatt BibbMarch 1817 to Nov. 1819 Governors of the State of Alabama. Wm. Wyatt BibbNov. 1819 to July, 1820 Thomas BibbJuly, 1820 to Nov. 1821 Israel PickensNov. 1821 to Nov. 1825 John Murph
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaska, (search)
ding many islands lying off the coast: area, as far as determined in 1900, 531,000 square miles; population, according to revised census reporertained by the United States Meteorological Survey and announced in 1900, are: Blackburn Mountain, 12,500 feet; Black Mountain, 12,500 feet; number of executive officers; and the creation by the President, in 1900, of a new military department comprising the entire Territory. Whey has since been continued with most fruitful results, and early in 1900 the Director of the Survey completed plans for thorough surveys and ted to occupy several years. As a result of explorations prior to 1900, mining operations on a large scale were undertaken, first in the nend its manifold interests and resources that had been acquired up to 1900, much of its vast expanse remained practically an unknown region, de with sea-coast outlets in the territory of the United States. In 1900 the all-water route to the Klondike was 2.705 miles from Seattle to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Albany, (search)
Fort Orange at first, then Beverswyck, and after the Province of New Netherland passed into the possession of the English it was called Albany, the second title of Duke James, afterwards James II. of England. Albany is yet full of the descendants of its early settlers, and has a large present importance by reason of its trade relations with the Western and Southern States, promoted by its exceptional shipping facilities by river, railroad, and canal. In 1890 the population was 93,313; in 1900, 94,151. Albany is especially noted in history because of the colonial conventions held there. The following is a synopsis of their most important transactions: First colonial convention. Thoroughly alarmed by the opening hostilities of the French and Indians on the frontiers, the colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, and Connecticut sent commissioners to Albany to hold a conference with the chiefs of the Five Nations, all of whom, excepting the Mohawks, had renewed their covenant of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexandria, (search)
Alexandria, City, port of entry, and county seat of Alexandria county, Va.; on the Potomac River, here a mile wide and providing an excellent harbor, and 6 miles below Washington, D. C. The city contains a number of high-grade educational institutions, and has important manufacturing industries. In 1890 the population was 14,339; in 1900, 14,528. In August, 1814, while the British were making their way across Maryland towards Washington, a portion of the British fleet, consisting of two frigates of thirty-six guns and thirty-eight guns, two rocket-ships of eighteen guns, two bomb-vessels of eight guns, and one schooner of two guns, sailed up the Potomac under the charge of Commodore Gordon, of the Sea Horse, and easily passed the guns of Fort Washington, the defenses of which the government a neglected. The British squadron appeared before the fort (Aug. 27), when the commander blew up the magazine and fled. The squadron passed and anchored in front of Alexandria, prepared t
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...