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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 173 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 51 3 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 42 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 21 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Julia Ward Howe or search for Julia Ward Howe in all documents.

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g-away of the army gathered at Cambridge unless a more efficient leader might be found, and, to avoid giving offence, they asked the Continental Congress to assume the regulation and direction of that army. Joseph Warren, in a private letter to Samuel Adams, wrote that the request was to be interpreted as a desire for the appointment of a new chief commander of all the troops that might be raised. Just then the news arrived of the approach of reinforcements for Gage, under Generals Clinton, Howe, and Burgoyne, and Congress felt the importance of acting promptly. At the suggestion of John Adams, the army was adopted as a continental one; and, at the suggestion of the New England delegation, Thomas Johnson. of Maryland, nominated George Washington, of Virginia, for commander-in-chief of the armies of the inchoate republic. He was elected (June 15, 1775) by unanimous vote, and on the following morning John Hancock, president of Congress, officially announced to Washington his appoint
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, (search)
s were hopeful. When the commander-in-chief was asked what he would do it Philadelphia should be taken, he replied, We will retreat beyond the Susquehanna River, and thence, if necessary, to the Alleghany Mountains. The great body of Quakers, numerous and influential in Pennsylvania, were opposed to the war, and loyalists abounded everywhere, Mifflin, who was a disowned member of the Society of Friends, and had witnessed the sudden growing lukewarmness of the Congress, fearing the effect of Howe's proclamation upon both, strongly recommended the removal of that body from Philadelphia. General Putnam, who had been sent to that city to fortify it, earnestly seconded Mifflin's proposition; and the Congress, trembling for their personal safety, gladly complied, and adjourned (Dec. 12), to meet at Baltimore, Dec. 20. Putnam was invested with almost absolute control of military affairs in Philadelphia, and the Congress delegated its executive powers to a resident committee composed of Ro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barry, John, 1745-1803 (search)
navy. Barry was transferred to the frigate Effingham; and in the Delaware, at the head of four boats, he captured an English schooner, Commodore Barry's monument. in 1777, without the loss of a man. He was publicly thanked by Washington. When Howe took Philadelphia, late in 1777, Barry took the Effingham Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. up the Delaware with the hope the Delaware with the hope of saving her, but she was burned by the British. Howe had offered him a large bribe if he would deliHowe had offered him a large bribe if he would deliver the ship to him at Philadelphia, but it was scornfully rejected. Barry took command of the Raleigh, 32, in September, 1778, but British cruisers compelled him to run her ashore in Penobscot Bay. In the frigate Alliance, in 1781, he sailed for France with Col. John Laurens, who was sent on a special mission; and afterwards he cruised successfully with that ship. At the close of May he captured the Atlanta and Trespass, after a severe fight. Returning in October, the Alliance was refitted,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bemis's Heights, battles of. (search)
om the American lines. Arnold urged Gates to attack him at dawn, but that officer would not consent. Burgoyne was hoping to receive good news from Sir Henry Clinton, who was preparing to ascend the Hudson with a strong force. So he intrenched his camp, put his troops in better spirits by a cheerful harangue, and resolved to wait for Clinton. The next morning he was himself cheered by a message from Clinton, who promised to make a diversion in his favor immediately; also by a despatch from Howe, announcing a victory over Washington on the Brandywine (see Brandywine, battle of). Burgoyne gave the glad tidings to his army, and wrote to Clinton that he could sustain his position until Oct. 12. But his condition rapidly grew worse. The American army hourly increased in numbers, and the militia were swarming on his flanks and rear. His foraging parties could get very little food for the starving horses, the militia so annoyed them. In his hospitals were 800 sick and wounded men, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blind, education of the, (search)
to 1784 there were no institutions in the world where the blind could be educated. In that year the first school was founded in Paris, by Valentine Hauy, and soon after similar institutions were organized in England and other European countries. The first school for the blind in the United States was established in Boston in 1829, by an act of the State legislature. Since then schools of the same character have been instituted in nearly every State. The pioneer workers in this field were Howe, Chapin, Williams, Wait, Little, Lord, Huntoon, Morrison, and Anagnos. The United States government has extended large aid to promote the education of the blind. In March, 1876, Congress passed an act appropriating $250,000 for a perpetual fund, the interest of which was to be used to purchase suitable books and apparatus for distribution among the various schools for the blind. The following is an official summary of the statistics of schools for the blind at the close of the school year
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boston, (search)
offered until February, when a council of officers decided that the undertaking would be too hazardous. Finally Colonel Knox, who had been sent to Ticonderoga to bring away cannon and mortars from that lace, returned with more than fifty great guns. Powder began to increase. Ten militia regiments came in to increase the strength of the besiegers. Heavy cannon were placed in battery before Boston. Secretly Dorchester Heights was occupied by the Americans, and fortified in a single night. Howe saw. for the first time, that he was in real danger, for the cannon at Dorchester commanded the town. First he tried to dislodge the provincials. He failed. A council of war determined that the only method of securing safety for the British army was to fly to the ocean. He offered to evacuate the town and harbor if Washington would allow him to do so quietly. The boon was granted, and on Sunday, March 17, 1776, the British fleet and army, accompanied by more than 1,000 loyalists, who dar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brandywine, battle on the. (search)
Brandywine, battle on the. When Washington learned that Howe was ascending Chesapeake Bay in the fleet of his brother, he marched (Aug. 24, 1777) from Philadelphia to meet him. At about the time he reached Wilmington Howe was landing his army, 18,000 strong, at the head of the Elk River, 54 miles from Philadelphia. Washington's effective force did not exceed 11,000 men, including 1,800 Pennsylvania militia. Howe's objective was Philadelphia, and he began his march (Sept. 3) in that direction through a country swarming with Tories. One division was led by Earl Corn-wallis, and the other by General Knyphausen. Washington had advanced almost to Red Clay Creek, and sent General Maxwell with his brigade to form an ambuscade in the direction of the enemy. In a skirmish the British were checked, but moved forward (Sept. 8) to attack Washington and turn his flank. By a dexterous movement in the night, the latter fell back to Chad's For, on the Brandywine Creek, above Wilmington, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howe, Julia Ward 1819- (search)
Howe, Julia Ward 1819- Author; born in New York, May 27, 1819; educated privately; married in 1843 Julia Ward Howe. Samuel Gridley Howe (q. v.), with whom prior to the Civil War she conducted the Boston Commonwealth, an anti-slavery paper. After the war she became actively interested in the cause of peace, woman suffrage, prison reform, and other movements. For many years she was a Unitarian preacher and a popular lecturer. She wrote the Battle hymn of the republic (see below); PassiJulia Ward Howe. Samuel Gridley Howe (q. v.), with whom prior to the Civil War she conducted the Boston Commonwealth, an anti-slavery paper. After the war she became actively interested in the cause of peace, woman suffrage, prison reform, and other movements. For many years she was a Unitarian preacher and a popular lecturer. She wrote the Battle hymn of the republic (see below); Passion flowers; Words for the hour; A trip to Cuba; The world's own; From the Oak to the olive; Later lyrics; Sex and education; Memoir of S. G. Howe; Life of Margaret Fuller; Modern Society; Is polite Society polite? from sunset Ridge, etc. Battle hymn of the republic. Mine eye hath seen the glory of the coming of the Lord: He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored; He hath loosed the fateful lightning of his terrible swift sword; His truth is marching on. I have seen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Songs of the Civil War, popular (search)
c, battle hymn of the republic, the Blue and the Gray, and Maryland, my Maryland, have a place in standard literature; others, which will be recognized by all who remember the years of 1861-65, though with less literary merit, became favorites as expressions of patriotic sentiment. Battle cry of freedom. Geo. F. Root. Yes, we'll rally round the flag, boys. Battle flag of the republic. O. W. Holmes. Flag of the heroes who left us their glory. Battle hymn of the republic Julia Ward Howe. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord. The Blue and the Gray. Francis M. Finch. By the flow of the inland river. Brave boys are they. Henry C. Work. Brave boys are they, gone at their country's call. Dixie (Southern). Albert Pike. Southrons hear your country call you. Dixie (Northern). T. M. Cooley. Away down South where grows the cotton. John Brown's body John Brown's body lies a-mould ring in the grave. Just before the battle, mothe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Staten Island, expedition to (search)
Staten Island, expedition to When Howe sailed southward (June, 1777) he left about 3,000 men, one-third of them loyalists, on Staten Island. Washington, who was watching Howe's movements, had placed Sullivan, with his division, near the coast in New Jersey. The British on the island continually plundered the Jerseymen on the main. Some of these plunderers, stationed nearly opposite Amboy, were attacked by Sullivan (Aug. 22) with about 1,000 men. He took several prisoners, and among the Howe's movements, had placed Sullivan, with his division, near the coast in New Jersey. The British on the island continually plundered the Jerseymen on the main. Some of these plunderers, stationed nearly opposite Amboy, were attacked by Sullivan (Aug. 22) with about 1,000 men. He took several prisoners, and among the spoils were the records and papers of the Yearly Meeting of Friends, which revealed such defection in the cause of the patriots that the Congress advised the council of Pennsylvania to arrest eleven of the leading and wealthy members of that society.
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