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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 63 results in 16 document sections:

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f Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress of June 6, 1900, re-organized the regular army and re-established the grade of lieutenant-general by the following provision: That the senior major-general of the line commanding the army shall have the rank, pay, and allowances of a lieutenant-general. In his annual message to Congress, Dec. 3, 1900, President McKinley urged a provision
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chancellorsville, battle of (search)
am on the right, and Stuart's and a part of Fitzhugh Lee's on the left. McLaws's forces occupied ththe opposing armies on the morning of May 2. Lee was unwilling to risk a direct attack on Hooker entire corps, so as to fall on Hooker's rear. Lee hesitated, but so much did he lean on Jackson aruggle for the possession of cannon. Meanwhile Lee was making a strong artillery Ruins of Chanceing. Hooker's force was now 60,000 strong, and Lee's 40,000. The former ordered Sedgwick to crossday morning. Stuart advanced to the attack with Lee's left wing, and when he came in sight of the Nred columns. Intelligence of these events made Lee extremely cautious. Sedgwick, leaving Gibbon idericksburg, marched for Chancellorsville, when Lee was compelled to divide his army to meet this n that Hooker's army had been much strengthened, Lee thought it necessary to drive Sedgwick across tksburg to Falmouth that night, and, on Tuesday, Lee had only Hooker to contend with. He concentrat[2 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chantilly, battle of (search)
, battle of On the morning after the second battle at Bull Run Pope was joined at Centreville by the corps of Franklin and Sumner. The next day (Sept. 1, 1862), Lee, not disposed to make a direct attack upon the Nationals, sent Jackson on another flanking movement, the latter taking with him his own and Ewell's division. With e returned to service in the West. The loss of Pope's army, from Cedar Mountain to Chantilly, in killed, wounded, prisoners, and missing, was estimated at 30,000. Lee's losses during the same time amounted to about 15,000. He claimed to have taken 7,000 prisoners, with 2,000 sick and wounded, thirty pieces of artillery, and 20,0imated at 30,000. Lee's losses during the same time amounted to about 15,000. He claimed to have taken 7,000 prisoners, with 2,000 sick and wounded, thirty pieces of artillery, and 20,000 small-arms. Of the 91,000 veteran troops from the Peninsula, lying near, Pope reported that only 20,500 men had joined him in confronting Lee.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chapultepec, battle of (search)
e some expert French gunners, was commanded by General Bravo. The whole hill was spotted with forts and outworks. To carry this strong post with the least loss of men, Scott determined to batter it with heavy cannon. Accordingly, on the night of Sept. 11. four batteries of heavy cannon were erected on a hill between Tucabaya and Chapultepec, commanded respectively by Captains Drew, Haynes. and Brooks, and Lieutenant Stone. They were placed in position by the engineer officers Huger and Lee (the latter afterwards commander-in-chief of the Confederate army). On the morning of the 12th these batteries opened fire, every ball crashing through the castle, and every shell tearing up the ramparts. The .fire of the Mexicans was not less severe, and this duel of great guns was kept up all day. The next morning (13th) troops moved to assail the works, at their weakest point, in two columns, one led by General Pillow and the other by General Quitman. Pillow marched to Castle of Chap
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Fitzhugh 1835- (search)
Lee, Fitzhugh 1835- Military officer; born in Clermont, Va., Nov. 19, 1835; nephew of Gen. Robert E. Lee; graduated at the United States Military Academy in Fitzhugh Lee. 1856, and entered the army as second lieutenant of the 2d Cavalry. In 1860 he was appointed instructor of cavalry at West Point, and in 1861 he resigned his commission to become adjutant-general under Ewell, in the Confederate army. From September, 1861, to July, 1862, he was lieutenant-colonel and colonel of the 1stFitzhugh Lee. 1856, and entered the army as second lieutenant of the 2d Cavalry. In 1860 he was appointed instructor of cavalry at West Point, and in 1861 he resigned his commission to become adjutant-general under Ewell, in the Confederate army. From September, 1861, to July, 1862, he was lieutenant-colonel and colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, with which he took part in all the movements of the Army of Northern Virginia. He was then promoted brigadier-general, and, on Sept. 3, 1863, major-general. From March, 1865, until he surrendered to General Meade, at Farmville, he commanded the whole cavalry corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. In 1886-90 he was governor of Virginia. In 1896 President Cleveland appointed him United States consul-general at Havana, where he served till war was declared against Spain. In
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Petersburg. (search)
ghting and defeating a cavalry force under Fitzhugh Lee. Kautz pushed on, and tore up the track of , south of the James. On Oct. 27 they assailed Lee's works on Hatcher's Run, westward of the WeldoVirginia and the concentration of the troops of Lee and Johnson south of the Roanoke. The politiciouthside Railway and to develop the strength of Lee's right. The entire army in front of Petersburs begun by the left, for the purpose of turning Lee's right, with an overwhelming force. At the sapproaching the Southside Railway to destroy it. Lee's right intrenched lines extended beyond Hatcheeet's corps, 8,000 strong, to defend Richmond. Lee had massed a great body of his troops—some 15,0y. This achievement effectually cut off one of Lee's most important communications. Gibbon's diviund Petersburg. Longstreet went to the help of Lee, and the latter ordered a charge to be made to t officers, was shot dead while reconnoitring. Lee now perceived that he could no longer hold Pete[16 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pleasant Hill, battle of. (search)
Pleasant Hill, battle of. When it was discovered that the Confederates were following the Nationals in strong force after the battle at Pleasant Grove, Banks formed a battle-line at Pleasant Hill, 15 miles east of the latter place, with Emory's division in the front, the right occupied by Dwight's brigade, another, under General Millan, in the centre, and a third, under Colonel Benedict, on the left. A New York battery was planted on a commanding hill. The army trains, guarded by Lee's cavalry, a brigade of colored troops, and Ransom's shattered columns, were sent some distance on the road towards Grand Ecore. Towards noon (April 9), the Confederate advance appeared, and between 5 and 6 P. M. a furious battle began. The assailants fell heavily on Emory's left, held by Benedict's brigade, with crushing force, and pushed it back. At the first onset, and while trying to rally his men to charge, Benedict was slain by a bullet which passed through his head. While the left was g
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pollard, Edward Albert 1828-1872 (search)
Pollard, Edward Albert 1828-1872 Journalist; born in Nelson county, Va., Feb. 27, 1828; graduated at the University of Virginia in 1849; studied law in Baltimore, Md., and was editor of the Richmond examiner in 1861-67. He was a stanch advocate of the Confederacy during the Civil War, but bitterly opposed Jefferson Davis's policy; was captured near the end of the war and held a prisoner for eight months. His publications include Letters of the Southern spy in Washington and elsewhere; Southern history of the War; Observations in the North; Eight months in prison and on parole; The lost cause; A New Southern history of the War of the Confederates; Lee and his Lieutenants; The lost cause regained; Life of Jefferson Davis, with the secret history of the Southern Confederacy; Black diamonds gathered in the Darky homes of the South; and The Virginia tourist. He died in Lynchburg, Va., Dec. 12, 1872.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pope, John 1822-1892 (search)
the matter was dropped. Captain Pope was one of the officers who escorted Mr. Lincoln to Washington (February, 1861), and in May was made brigadier-general of volunteers and appointed to a command in Missouri, where he operated successfully until the capture of Island Number10, in 1862. In March, 1862, he became major-general of volunteers, and in April he took command of a division of Halleck's army. Late in June he was summoned to Washington to take command of the Army of Virginia, where, for fifteen days from Aug. 18, he fought the Confederate army under Lee continuously; but finally was compelled to take refuge behind the defences of Washington. At his own request, he was relieved of the command of the Army of Virginia and assigned to that of the Northwest. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general; in 1882 was promoted major-general; and in 1886 was retired. He died in Sandusky, O., Sept. 23, 1892. See Grant, Ulysses Simpson; Logan, John Alexander; Porter, Fitz-John.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Prescott, Richard 1725-1788 (search)
h thirty-eight picked men, in four whale-boats, accompanied by a negro named Prince, crossed Narraganset Bay from Warwick Point at 9 P. M. on July 10, 1777, to accomplish the task. Barton divided his men into small parties, and to each assigned a special duty. Misleading the sentinel at the gate of the house, belonging to Samuel Overton, Barton entered. Prescott was sleeping in an upper room. Ascending to it, Prescott's headquarters. the negro burst in a panel of the door, through which Barton entered, seized the general, bade him be perfectly silent, and, hurrying him to one of the boats, thrust him in, and there allowed him to dress. He was taken to Warwick Point, and from thence he was sent to Washington's headquarters in New Jersey. He was finally exchanged for General Lee; went back to Rhode Island, and remained in command there until it was evacuated, Oct. 25, 1779. He was made major-general in 1777, and lieutenant-general in 1782. He died in England in October, 1788.
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